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Research Article
Open Access Peer-reviewed

Using Interactive Whiteboard in Teaching Islamic Education and Its Effect on Some Variables

Mahmoud J. Al-Salkhi
American Journal of Educational Research. 2019, 7(3), 249-257. DOI: 10.12691/education-7-3-10
Received December 25, 2018; Revised March 02, 2019; Accepted March 20, 2019

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of using Interactive Whiteboard in teaching Islamic Education on the achievement and learning motivation of the 7th grade students. The empirical method was used in this study. The study sample consisted of 89 participants who were selected randomly. The achievement test and learning motivation scales were used as study tools. The results have shown statistically significant differences in post-achievement due to the method of teaching, and were in favor of Interactive Whiteboard, and also in favor of male students. In addition, some statistically significant differences were indicated between the average scores of the experimental group on the pre - and post-motivational scale as shown in the post-application. Also, significant differences were indicated between the average performance of the two groups on the learning motivation scale of the Islamic Education, and was in favor of the experimental group. The absence of a statistically significant effect on students' achievement and learning motivation were attributed to the interaction between the teaching method and the gender of the students.

1. Introduction

This age has witnessed a huge scientific progress in the area of technology and communication. Consequently, this progress leads to information development in all aspects of life. Also, it has significantly affected the life patterns and its methods in serving the human beings and facilitating their lives. This progress covered the technology development in the area of education especially the learning environment, its process, inputs, and outputs. Also, the learning audio-visual aids became a part of a comprehensive system that embraces the individual, ideas, methods, and all factors that affect the learning process. Despite the increase of the new technology learning cost, it is hoped that the end result will be more effective learning that deserved the additional cost and efforts.

Learning technology is considered an application field for many theories of learning psychology and knowledge psychology. Following are examples of cognitive processes analyzed by psychology and applied by learning technology:

Attention: The teacher needs to attract the attention of his students during the learning process. Therefore, he may need to use learning aids such as films or recorded material.

Perception: Recognizing things is done through senses. For example, the human being can recognize colors and distinguish safe things from dangerous ones by using his vision. Also, by hearing we can recognize the source of sounds at different times. This is how perception is achieved by using one or more of the five senses. The ability of perception differs from one individual to another based on individual experience and intelligence. Based on these individual differences, proper learning audio-visual aids should be used to meet the needs of different learners.

Directions: Directed learning aids help learners develop their future objectives and interesting values.

It is of worth noting that using a group of integrated learning aids in the classroom will result in achieving more in-depth and effective learning experience. Experiments have proved that the more senses contribute in the learning process; the more experience and knowledge are achieved. This is due to the fact that the balance of the individual’s mental, psychological, and physical abilities provides a healthy environment for learning and development 1.

It has been confirmed by 2 that the effective learning is achieved by the interaction of the learner with the elements of the learning process. This will help the learner build his knowledge and acquire his skills by comparing his previous experience with the gained knowledge and skills.

The researcher believes that the innovative roles of teachers should be taken into consideration in view of applying the electronic learning. This requires major changes in the educational policies and their implementation. Also, the new policies require teachers to understand their new learning roles in the classroom. The new role includes using the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB). The idea of designing this board started in 1987 by David Martin and Nancy Polten in a big information technology company in Canada and America. Following the researches on the advantages of the IWB, the actual production of the Smart whiteboard by Smart Company was in 1991 and was called White Board Interactive 3. The Interactive whiteboard is a big white screen connected to a computer, and works by touching it or writing on the screen by a special pen. Also, the board can be used to exhibit clearly to all students different applications shown on the computer screen. The new technology provides the following unique features 4:

• Replacing the traditional display technology with more attractive methods using the IWB.

• Providing control of the displaying text, pictures, and drawings.

• Utilizing the sources and materials of the Internet more creatively and effectively.

• Providing a space for storing the learning materials and getting them back easily.

• Providing the opportunity for an immediate feedback.

• Providing the opportunity for group observation of the displayed content.

• Using the computer programs in the classroom without being near the computer.

• Designing computerized learning activities.

• The possibility of adding comments or explanations to the learning video tape.

• Allowing students to interact with the computer by using their fingers or pens.

Although the Smart Board has many advantages, it shows the following defects when using it:

• The purchasing and maintenance cost are both high.

• High level of training is needed to enable the student use it effectively.

• A lot of time will be wasted to train those teachers who lack the skills of using it.

• In case the electricity is suddenly shut down, the learning process will be disrupted if the teacher does not have an alternative plan to keep the process going on.

• Safety in the classroom might be risky due to the electrical connections in case the necessary safety measures are not taken.

1.1. Interactive Whiteboard Constituents

An interactive whiteboard (IWB) is a large interactive display that connects to a computer. A projector projects the computer's desktop onto the board's surface where users control the computer using a pen, finger, stylus, or other device. The board is typically mounted to a wall or floor stand. Upon downloading the programs of the smart board on the computer, two Icons appear: one on the desktop and the other Icon on the system. You will see the tape of duties downward and on the right the Icon of the white board tools. When you click on this Icon, you observe a square that contains the following 4:

• The programs available on the smart board including the Note Book that allows the user to write, add, move and color pictures. Also, it allows changing the background of the pictures to meet the needs of the teacher.

• A program that records the teacher’s notes or comments such as highlighting or underlining important points and drawing circles or squares.

• A video player used to display any stored material such as explained lessons or any film that the teacher would like to display and write any comments on it.

• Screen Keyboard that allows us to convert hand writing to typed writing.

• Control Panel used to change the color of any electronic pen, or change the size of typing or the electronic area.

The usage of the whiteboard in the learning process has many positive results such as enjoying learning activities, increasing class cooperation, developing learning motivation, and achieving leaning outcomes of all courses that meet the needs of students of different ages 5.

The whiteboard educational system shows that the teacher can record and redisplay the lessons after being memorized. Also, the teacher can type the lesson or send it by e-mail to his students. By doing so, the students will concentrate on the teacher’s explanation instead of wasting time in taking notes, as they know that they will receive all explanations in the form of typed notes or digital copy by the end of the class period. It is of note that the large volume of displayed material on the whiteboard will significantly develop students’ knowledge and skills related to the production of learning programs 6.

1.2. Interactive White Board in Jordan

The Ministry of Education in Jordan has exerted great efforts in using the whiteboard in schools. The usage of the whiteboard started in the private schools in 2006. It was used by some pioneer public schools in 2007. The application of the whiteboard was extended between 2009 and 2011 to cover all provinces through “My School” initiative. The total number of different Whiteboards in the pioneer schools became 124, and selected teachers were trained to use these boards 7.

1.3. Review of Related Literature

Recently the whiteboard technology has gained great interest from Arabic and foreign studies. To mention some of these studies:

A study conducted by 8 to investigate the effects of the study levels of the participants involved in the research on the students' attitudes towards interactive whiteboards (IWB) in higher education. The greatest effect induced by higher study levels was observed at the availability of use of IWB factor, respectively at the perception on using IWB in the educational process. Although there are some positive interactions regarding interactive whiteboards, students accept only gradually the introduction of the new technologies, along with their progression in study level.

The study of 9 aimed at recognizing the effect of using the smart board on the achievement of the 11th grade students in the Biology course, and their attitudes towards the smart board as a learning tool in Kuwait. The study sample consisted of 60 students divided into two groups: experimental group consisted of 30 students who studied using the smart board, and control group of 30 students who studied using the traditional method. The study results confirmed the existence of statistical indicative differences in the post-achievement test of the two groups, and in favor of the experimental group.

The purpose of 10 study is to investigate Turkish public school teachers’ and principals’ perceptions regarding professional development opportunities and practices that may be available for interactive whiteboard (IWB) use. The Participants of this study were a pool of teachers and principals of public schools in Istanbul, Turkey. Both teachers and principals were asked to fill out a survey developed by the investigator which consists of four major areas: frequency of use of IWBs, type of training received, any other training the school provides, and teachers’ perceptions of or satisfaction with the IWB training they receive. The results of the study proved to be very helpful to teachers and schools who use IWBs for instructional purposes.

Ozerbas conducted a study aimed at showing the effect of using the IWB on the students’ motivation levels. The study sample consisted of 50 male and female students studying in the elementary teaching division at Ghazi University. In the experimental Group, 25 students used the IWB, and in the Control Group, 25 students studied using only the computer display. The experiment lasted for four weeks. The results showed big difference between the two groups. Comparing the pre-motivation with the post-motivation results of the two groups indicated statistical differences in favor of the experimental Group 11.

Another study was conducted by 12 to compare the effect of using the smart board and using the traditional board on the spontaneous and postponed achievement of the 6th primary grade students in Arabic Grammar. The study sample was divided into an experimental group and a control group. The study results showed the existence of statistical indicative differences in the spontaneous achievement and in favor of the experimental group.

Riska study has aimed at identifying the effect of the smart board technology on increasing the growth of the talented students' physical performance. Moreover, it tackled to the smart board's effect on the students' performance in the international standardized exams in the USA. The study sample consisted of 175 4th graders from six different primary schools. The sample was divided into two groups: experimental and controlled. The results have shown no statistically differences between the experimental students' performance, who have learned using the smart board technique, and those who have not 13.

Jordan Education Initiative has applied a study aimed at recognizing the impact of the promethean Smart Board on learning and teaching in Discover Schools' in Amman. The study sample consisted of 17 teachers and 175 students from 4 Discovery schools; 3 (girls' schools) (1 boys' school). The results have shown that most of the teachers and students look at using the interactive board as an important tool to motivate and stimulate the learning environment. Moreover, its use increases the participation and attention in the classrooms 14.

Also, another study was conducted by 15 aimed at revealing the impact of the use of multimedia computerized program utilizing the smart board on fostering the 5th graders' performance and some cognitive skills in Saudi Arabia. The results have shown statistically clear differences favored to those who are in the experimental group.

A study was conducted by 16 to acknowledge the effect of the smart board on the motivation of students and their study achievement in Mathematics. The study sample consisted of 24 students (11 males & 13 females) in the 1st primary grade. The sample was distributed into an experimental group who used the smart board in their study, and a control group that used the blackboard. The study results confirmed the existence of statistical indicative differences in the post-achievement test of the two groups, and in favor of the experimental group. Also, the study noted that the smart board has contributed in increasing the motivation of students to learn Mathematics

Also, another study was conducted by 17 to investigate the effect of using the smart board on the achievement of reading, language, and mathematical skills. The study sample was formed from (3000) students that covered the 3rd primary grade until the 8th primary grade. The sample was divided to two groups: experimental group who studied by using the smart boards, and control group who did not use the smart board. The study results showed the existence of statistical indicative differences in the study achievement of the two groups in reading and language, and in favor of the experimental group

The study of 18 aimed at identifying the impact of interactive whiteboard on the increase of the interaction between teacher and student in reading, writing and math. 184 lessons have been observed over two years on a sample of primary teachers using the Interactive board through a computerized model Show. The study concluded that the use of interactive whiteboard did not bring about fundamental changes in the educational process. Interactive whiteboard usage led to some changes in the interaction between the teacher and student. However, these changes have not been of that great influence and importance claimed by the advocates of the use of the IWB.

Additionally, a study was conducted by 19 to investigate the effect of using the smart board on the achievement of the 3rd and 4th primary grade students in Mathematics. In order to meet this objective, a study sample of 93 male and female students was formed. This sample was divided to two groups. The first one was a control group formed from 32 male and female students. The second group is an experimental group consisted of 29 male and female students. Students of the control group studied Mathematics using desk computers, while the experimental group used the smart board. The study results showed the existence of statistical indicative differences in the average achievement scores of the two groups in Mathematics. The higher achievement was in favor of the experimental group who used the smart board.

1.4. Study Problem

The study problem rises from the need to diversify the modern learning technologies in teaching the Islamic Education course, especially after the study of 20 reported the existence of difficulties facing the teachers in dealing with the learning technologies. Such difficulties may reflect negatively on the students’ comprehension of the Islamic concepts that encourage teachers to search for different technologies that would help students in learning.

The interactive whiteboard is considered one of the modern learning technologies due to its ability to merge the modern technology with the conventional learning methods. Also, using the IWB is beneficial in improving the achievement and motivation of students in Islamic Education.

1.5. Study Questions

This study tried to answer the following questions:

First Question: Are there any statistical indicative difference at the level (α = 0.05) in the achievement of the 7th primary grade students attributed to the study method (Interactive Whiteboard (IWB) vs. conventional method) or gender or interaction between them?

Second Question: What is the motivation level of the 7th primary grade students to learn the Islamic Education before and after the study? Is there any statistical indicative difference at the level (α = 0.05) between them?

Third Question: Is there any statistical indicative differences at the level (α = 0.05) between them the average scores of the 7th primary grade students on the motivation scale to learn the Islamic Education? Are such differences (if any) attributed to the learning method (Interactive Whiteboard (IWB) vs. conventional method) or gender of interaction between them?

1.6. Study Importance

The importance of the study is due to the fact that it goes in line with the directions of the Jordanian Ministry of Education to introduce the modern educational technologies in order to keep abreast of the development and progress of technology. Also, this study highlights the learning value of using the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB) in teaching Islamic Education. This study may provide a feedback to those involved in teaching Islamic Education in order to introduce this technology in their plans.

In addition, the new technology may offer a feedback to the curriculum specialists in order to develop a computerized curriculum and modify education plans in light of the results obtained from this study.

1.7. Study Objectives

This study aims at revealing the effect of using the (IWB) in the study achievement and motivation of the 7th primary grade students in Jordan. Also, the study tries to find out if there are any statistical indicative differences between the experimental group and control group in their study achievement attributed to the learning method (conventional vs. IWB). Also, the study aims at finding the motivation level of the same students in the Islamic Education. In addition, it aims at knowing if there are any statistical indicative differences between the experimental group and control group in the level of their motivation attributed to the learning method (conventional vs. IWB).

1.8. Study Limitations

Time Limitation: This study was conducted according to the existing circumstances in the second semester of the academic year 2016/2017.

Place and Human Resources Limitations: The study sample was selected exclusively from the 7th primary grade students at Al-Hasad Al-Tarbawi School and the Pioneer Educational School in Amman.

2. Methodology

In this study, the researchers used the Quasi-experimental method to disclose the effect of using the IWB on the achievement of the 7th grade students in the Islamic Education course. The study sample was divided into the experimental Group that learned using the IWB, and the Control Group that learned using the conventional method. In addition, the researcher used the survey method in applying a special scale to measure the motivation toward learning the Islamic Education.

2.1. Study Group

This group included all 7th grade students at Al-Hasad and the Pioneer Educational School which are observed by the Directorate of the Private Education in Amman. The group was formed in the second semester of the 2016/2017 academic year.

2.2. Study Sample

The researcher selected the study sample intentionally from the two schools. Also, he selected the members of the experimental and Control Groups by a simple random sampling method. The study sample included 89 male and female students.

2.3. Study Tools
2.3.1. Achievement Test of Islamic Education

The researcher developed this test to measure the achievement of the 7th primary students in the Prophet Biography unit in the second part of the Islamic Education textbook. The test was made of 24 items. The validity of the test logic was investigated regarding its linguistic formulation, clearness, and comprehension. The test was reviewed by a group of arbitrators who have experience in the curriculum and teaching methods of Islamic Education. After receiving their feedback, 20 items were finally accredited in the test. Also, the test was applied on a pioneer sample of 23 students to confirm its reliability. After that the reliability coefficient was calculated using the Cronbach Alpha formula. It was found that the internal consistency coefficient of the test was (0.81), and this value is acceptable for the purpose of this study.


2.3.2. Measure of Motivation for Learning the Islamic Education

The researcher developed this measure depending on the theoretical literature and related studies, as well as the measures of achievement motivation. The measure was sent to a group of arbitrators for their review and feedback regarding its suitability to the study purposes. Finally, the test was formed from 29 items. In order to confirm its reliability, the Cronbach Alpha formula was used to calculate the internal consistency of the test. The value of this coefficient was found (0.86) which is considered acceptable for the study purposes.

2.4.Study Procedure

The researcher followed in applying his study the following procedural steps:

• Creating a materialistic learning environment:

The researcher avail a materialistic learning environment for the experimental group. This environment contains Interactive Whiteboard with its accessories, a computer, and a data display screen. Whereas, the learning environment available for the control group was a classroom without a IWB.

The learning process using the IWB has the following steps:

− Displaying the learning material, and using colors, pictures, and films.

− Using the shadow tools to concentrate the light on main points of the subject.

− Writing a summary of the main ideas to be used as a reference when explaining ambiguous points.

− Searching the internet to get learning material and various programs in connection with the teaching subject in order to enrich the learning process.

− Requesting the students individually or in groups to display their ideas, answers, and assignments using electronic devices. The display is followed by discussion and receiving feedback from participants. In view of the feedback, necessary corrections are directly made on the IWB.

− Conducting performance evaluation by the teacher and the student himself, or student group based on the IWB.

• Training the teacher how to plan and teach the experimental and control groups

The teacher was trained how two to teach students in the two groups. In teaching the control group, the teacher was instructed to use the conventional method which depends on lecture and discussion using the ordinary board. Whereas, in teaching the experimental group, the teachers held discussion sessions to clarify the teaching mechanism. The first step in the teaching process is to make sure that the whiteboard and its tools are functioning well.

The teaching method using the Interactive Whiteboard was based on the teaching strategy suggested by Brandon (2004) in which he emphasized on the meaningful learning which has five fundamentals:

1st: Active learning in which the student is fully involved in an intellectual treatment of the acquired knowledge, and he holds responsibility for the obtained results.

2nd: Duality of learning in which the student connects the new ideas with the previously acquired knowledge to develop meaningful concepts.

3rd: Specification of a learning target that the student tries with a keen desire to achieve by selecting from various resources what he needs to fulfill his objective.

4th: Genuine and meaningful learning whose outcomes represent an actual world and realistic life.

5th: Cooperative learning that emphasizes interactive discussion between students supported by technology.

2.5. Equivalence of the Two Study Groups

To confirm the equivalence of the two groups’ scores in the Islamic Education for the first semester of the academic year 2016/2017, the arithmetic means and standard deviations were calculated. Also, the test “T” results were calculated for the independent samples to show the statistical indicative differences between the arithmetic means illustrated in Table 2.

Table 2 shows that no statistical indicative differences exist at the level (α= 0.05) between the arithmetic means of the scores of the two study groups in the Islamic Education for the first semester of the academic year 2016/2017. This indicates the equivalence of the two groups.

2.6. Equivalence in the Pre-Test

To assure the equivalence of the two groups, the test was applied on the members of the two groups as a pre-test and prior to teaching the Prophet Biography unit. Table 3 shows the arithmetic means and standard deviations of the scores of the two study groups in the pre-test achievement.

In order to know the indicative differences between the arithmetic means, the analysis of the dual difference was used, and the results are shown in the Table 4.

The results of the above table shows no statistical indicative at the level (α =0.05) between the means of pre-test results that are attributed to gender or group or the interaction between them. This indicates the equivalence of the two groups in their pre-achievement in the Islamic Education. This can be seen in Figure 1.

2.7. Equivalence of the Two Study Groups on the Motivation Measure

The motivation measure was applied prior to run the experiment, and the results were shown in the Table 5.

3. Study Results and Discussion

3.1. The Results Pertaining to the First Question

Are there any statistical indicative differences at the level (α =0.05) in the achievement of the 7th primary grade students in the Islamic Education course? Also, are these differences, if any, attributed to the teaching method (IWB vs. conventional method), gender, or the interaction between them?

In order to answer this question, the arithmetic means and standard deviations have been calculated to measure the performance of the two study groups on the post-achievement test as shown in the Table 6.

It is observed from the above table that the arithmetic means of the Experimental Group (males &females) are higher than those of the Control Group (males & females). In order to find the range of the statistical indicative of these difference. Then, the analysis of the dual differences was used.

The analysis of the results of dual differences given in Table 7 indicates the existence of statistical indicative differences at the level (α= 0.05) between the two study groups. Comparing the arithmetic means of the two groups clearly indicated that this difference was in favor of the Experimental Group. This means that the achievement of students (males & females) who studied using the IWB was better than those students (males & females) who studied using the conventional method.

The above study results agreed with the studies conducted by (Zittle, 2004), (Al-Asmari, 2011), (Swan et al, 2009), (Aljwair, 2009), (Paino, 2009), and finally (Al-Rasheed, 2014). Also, these results were in line with the findings of the theoretical literature and previous studies that agreed with the excellence of the IWB over the conventional method.

There discrepancy has been observed between the study result and Riska (2010) which revealed no statistically differences between the experimental students' performance, who have learned using the whiteboard technique, and those who have not.

These results may be attributed to many factors such as:

→ Using more than one sense in the learning situation. The special design of the IWB takes into consideration the learner’s senses to enable him using more than one sense through the learning process.

→ The ability of the user to control whatever displayed on the screen such as texts, drawings, pictures, and demonstrative drawings in various colors. Also, IWB provides a feature that enables the learner to change the background and colors of the screen. Also, it provides different pencils with many colors.

→ The IWB saves time and effort by recording the entire learning process by using a camera attached to the screen. All these features contributed in improving the students’ achievement.

→ The IWB provides a flexible teaching method. This method can accommodate an effective collection of learning tools and activities given in an interesting and desirable context.

→ The IWB method considers the student the center of the learning process that depends on the student’s activity. All these factors have an important role in meeting the desired and target learning objectives.

Also, the analysis of the results of dual differences given in Table 7 indicates the existence of statistical indicative differences at the level (α= 0.05) between the achievement of the male and female students of the 7th primary grade. The results were in favor of the male students whose arithmetic mean of their scores was (15.377), whereas the arithmetic mean of the female scores was (13.954). This is a clear indicator that the gender factor has a great effect in creating a difference between male and female students in their achievement of the Islamic Education course.

There discrepancy has been observed between the study result and Jordan Education Initiative (2010) which revealed that the using of IWB in girls' schools better than male schools.

In spite of the fact that IWB has a keen interest in developing the various competencies of all students regardless of their gender, and considering the student as an individual learner who is interested in developing his capabilities and skills, yet the achievement of male students in the Islamic Education course was better than that of female students.

→ Finally, regarding the interaction between the teaching method and gender, it has been observed from Table (7) that there is no statistical indicative difference at the level (α = 0.05). This indicates that the performance of the Experimental Group (males & females) on the achievement test was not affected by the gender. Also, it is found that using the IWB has no effect on the achievement of male and female students as shown in Figure 2.

3.2. The Results Pertaining to the Second Question

What is the motivation level of the 7th primary grade students to learn the Islamic Education before and after the study? Is there any statistical indicative difference at the level (α = 0.05) between them?

To answer this question, test “T” was used to compare the arithmetic means on the pre- and post motivation measure toward learning the Islamic Education, as shown in the next table.

The above table shows that there is a statistical indicative difference at the level (α = 0.05) between the arithmetic of the scores of the Experimental Group on the pre- and post- motivation measure. This confirms the existence of a difference between the pre- and post- motivation toward learning the Islamic Education, and in favor of the post-motivation. This is because the teaching of the Prophet Biography using the IWB attracts the attention and excites the motivation of Experimental Group students through their reaction with the displayed films and activities that attract students to study the Islamic Education, and this has been observed by the teachers.

Also, the above result can be explained by the fact that using the IWB converts the classroom into a scientific, educational, and luxurious field. This learning environment becomes attractive to the students and enables them to easily comprehend the scientific material displayed by an attractive and desirable image. Also, the IWB method provides learners the opportunity to see and hear things simultaneously, and thus reacts with the lesson with his senses and emotions which make the introduced material deeply understood and retained in mind.

This result agrees with the study results reported by (Paino, 2009), Jordan Education Initiative (2010) and (Ozerbas, 2013) who indicated that IWB contributed to the enhancement of students’ learning motivation.

3.3. The Results Pertaining to the Third Question

Is there any statistical indicative differences at the level (α = 0.05) between them the average scores of the 7th primary grade students on the motivation scale to learn the Islamic Education? Are such differences (if any) attributed to the learning method (Interactive Whiteboard (IWB) vs. conventional method) or gender of interaction between them?

To answer this question, the arithmetic means and standard deviations have been calculated for the performance of the two study groups on the post-motivation measure, as shown in the next table.

Table 9 shows the existence of differences in arithmetic means of the performance of the two study groups on the post-motivation measure. In order to ensure if these differences have statistical indication, dual differences analysis was performed, as shown in the next table.

The results of Table 10 show the existence of a statistical indicative difference between the arithmetic means of performance of the two study groups on post-motivation measure, and in favor of the Experimental Group. This means that the students who used the IWB support in learning have their motivation excited more than the motivation of the Conventional Group students. This result agrees with the study results reported by (Paino, 2009) and (Ozerbas, 2013) which mentioned that the IWB contributed to the enhancement of students’ motivation for learning.

The researcher believes that the above result would be attributed to the fact that teaching using the IWB is considered as a type of innovation that attracts the interest and attention of students. This innovated method of teaching enables students to get rid of routine and direct instructions and authority of the teacher.

The use of IWB provides students with a sort of freedom in learning; especially this method includes different colors, sounds, and movable figures. Also, IWB provides a new learning experience that motivates the student to interact with the whiteboard, and learn in an environment full of enthusiasm. Whereas, the conventional method cannot create such learning environment.

Also, the results of the Dual differences analysis given in Table 10 indicated the existence of a statistical indicative difference is observed at level (α = 0.05) between the motivation level of male and female students in the 7th primary grade, and in favor of the male students whose arithmetic mean of motivation level for learning Islamic Education was (99.377). Whereas, this level was (90.750) for female students.

Regarding the interaction between the variables of group and gender, it is obvious from Table 10 that there is no statistical indicative differences between the above arithmetic means, and this result is confirmed by the indication value of (0.6881) as shown in Figure 3.

This means that the IWB used in this study can be applied in the learning of both male and female students. This is due to the fact that the IWB support was not directed to a specific gender or group. Researcher made sure that the tool covered the educational material, and took into consideration the growth of both genders.

4. Conclusion

In the light of the results obtained by the researcher, it has been concluded that using the IWB support in teaching Prophet Biography improves the achievement level of the students in the 7th primary grade compared to those students who used the conventional method. This conclusion confirms the result of the present research that the students of the experimental group who learned using the IWB have demonstrated higher level of achievement compared to those students of the control group who learned using the conventional method. Also, the research results showed that the students who used the IWB were more motivated to learn the Islamic Education than the students of the control group.

5. Recommendations

Based on the study results, the researcher recommends the following:

• Adopting IWB support in teaching the Islamic Education.

• Arranging training workshops for teachers in the Ministry of Education to train them how to use the IWB support.

• Conducting a study surveying the views of the teachers of the Islamic Education toward using the IWB support.

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[15]  Aljwair, A. (2009): The effect of using multimedia computerized programme teaching science using the smart board on the primary stage students' performance and cognitive skills. Master thesis, unpublished. Faculty of Education, Literary Departments, Prince Noura bint Abdulrahman University.
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[16]  Paino, T. (2009). Effect of Technology on student Achievement and motivation in mathematics. Unpublished Master Thesis. Caldwell College.
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[17]  Swan, K., kratcoski, A., Schenker, J& Van, M. (2009(. Interactive whiteboards and student Achievement: Practices that enhance efficacy. Annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association .San Diago. USA.
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[18]  Smith, F. Hardman, F. and Higgins S. 2006: The impact of interactive whiteboards on teacher-pupil interaction in the national literacy and numeracy strategies, British Educational Research Journal, 32(3), 443-457.
In article      View Article
 
[19]  [19]Zittle, F. (2004). Enhancing Native American Mathematics Learning: The Use of Smart board-generated Virtual manipulative for Conceptual Understanding. In L. Cantoni & C. McLoughlin (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia: World Conference on Educational Media and Technology, 2004 (pp. 5512-5515). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).
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[20]  Alsalkhi, M. (2014). Difficulties of Teaching Islamic Education As Viewed By the Female Teachers of the Lower Basic Stage In Amman. Journal of Education / Kuwait University, N.113, 47-54.
In article      
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2019 Mahmoud J. Al-Salkhi

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Mahmoud J. Al-Salkhi. Using Interactive Whiteboard in Teaching Islamic Education and Its Effect on Some Variables. American Journal of Educational Research. Vol. 7, No. 3, 2019, pp 249-257. http://pubs.sciepub.com/education/7/3/10
MLA Style
Al-Salkhi, Mahmoud J.. "Using Interactive Whiteboard in Teaching Islamic Education and Its Effect on Some Variables." American Journal of Educational Research 7.3 (2019): 249-257.
APA Style
Al-Salkhi, M. J. (2019). Using Interactive Whiteboard in Teaching Islamic Education and Its Effect on Some Variables. American Journal of Educational Research, 7(3), 249-257.
Chicago Style
Al-Salkhi, Mahmoud J.. "Using Interactive Whiteboard in Teaching Islamic Education and Its Effect on Some Variables." American Journal of Educational Research 7, no. 3 (2019): 249-257.
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  • Figure 1. Shows the interaction the teaching method and gender in the pre-achievement of the7th primary grade students in the Islamic Education course
  • Figure 2. Shows the effect of interaction between teaching method and gender on the Post-achievement of the 7th primary grade students in the Islamic Education
  • Table 2. Shows the arithmetic means and standard deviations for the students’ scores in the first semester of the academic year 2014/2015
  • Table 3. Represents the arithmetic means and standard deviations of the scores of the two study groups in the pre-test achievement
  • Table 5. Shows the arithmetic Means, Standard Deviations, and the results of (T) test on the pre-motivation measure
  • Table 6. Shows the arithmetic means and standard deviations of the two study groups on the post-achievement test
  • Table 8. Shows the results of test “T” to compare the arithmetic means on the pre-and post-motivation measure toward learning Islamic Education
  • Table 9. The arithmetic means and standard deviations of the performance of the two study groups on the post-motivation measure
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In article      
 
[13]  Riska، (2010). The Impact of Smart Board technology on Growth in mathematics achievement of gifted learners, school of Education, North Carolina.
In article      
 
[14]  Jordan Education Initiative (2010). Promethean interactive white boards in the /discovery schools. Retrieved April 18, 2012, from: http://www.jei.org.jo.
In article      
 
[15]  Aljwair, A. (2009): The effect of using multimedia computerized programme teaching science using the smart board on the primary stage students' performance and cognitive skills. Master thesis, unpublished. Faculty of Education, Literary Departments, Prince Noura bint Abdulrahman University.
In article      
 
[16]  Paino, T. (2009). Effect of Technology on student Achievement and motivation in mathematics. Unpublished Master Thesis. Caldwell College.
In article      
 
[17]  Swan, K., kratcoski, A., Schenker, J& Van, M. (2009(. Interactive whiteboards and student Achievement: Practices that enhance efficacy. Annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association .San Diago. USA.
In article      
 
[18]  Smith, F. Hardman, F. and Higgins S. 2006: The impact of interactive whiteboards on teacher-pupil interaction in the national literacy and numeracy strategies, British Educational Research Journal, 32(3), 443-457.
In article      View Article
 
[19]  [19]Zittle, F. (2004). Enhancing Native American Mathematics Learning: The Use of Smart board-generated Virtual manipulative for Conceptual Understanding. In L. Cantoni & C. McLoughlin (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia: World Conference on Educational Media and Technology, 2004 (pp. 5512-5515). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).
In article      
 
[20]  Alsalkhi, M. (2014). Difficulties of Teaching Islamic Education As Viewed By the Female Teachers of the Lower Basic Stage In Amman. Journal of Education / Kuwait University, N.113, 47-54.
In article