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Research Article
Open Access Peer-reviewed

Social Radar as a Necessity in the School Workplace: Review of Goleman’s Reinforcements on Emotional Intelligence

Kintu Godfrey, Musiime Joseline, Muweesi Charles , Mugabo Augustine, Disan Kuteesa Mugyenyi, Achan Nancy
American Journal of Educational Research. 2022, 10(4), 179-181. DOI: 10.12691/education-10-4-3
Received February 27, 2022; Revised March 28, 2022; Accepted April 05, 2022

Abstract

The purpose of this review was to establish the relevancy of social radar in the day to day work as underpinned from Goleman book working with emotional Intelligence Chapter three (3), which prorogates that Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a more important factor than Intelligent Quotient (IQ) to enjoying a successful life and maintaining fruitful and secure relationships with others. After a review, it was found out that lack of a social radar leads to social awkwardness, that a person can have the best training in the world, possess an incisive and analytical mind or even the supply of endless ideas, but still would not make a good leader without empathy (social radar). Arising out of the review, it concluded that empathic leaders more so in schools with good people skills (social radar) know intuitively how to build bridges to others so that relationship bonds are robust. It recommends that for leaders to have the best social radar, should strive to listen well, gain perspective of others and give help to others.

1. Introduction

The term, “Social Radar,” may have come from the internationally known psychologist, Daniel Goleman. Social radar is observing others within a special setting; (facial expressions, body language, time of voice, what they are saying, and how they react to one another. In the workplace or any social circle, we often bump into someone who just doesn’t seem to get it. They tend to say or do things that shock others. For example; Bad manners; is not about knowing the proper placement of the fork, butter knife, or spoon at a formal table setting. You might think of this as things like coughing without covering your mouth, belching, or other human behaviors that socially most would consider foul. Another example according to Goleman 1 is gutter mouth. Businesses and organizations all have a culture. Some may not find swearing or locker room talk offensive, but others find it strongly offensive. Make sure you understand your environment, error on the side of no foul language. Further, wrong humor is also an example of things people do those shock others. When you combine bad manners with the gutter mouth you might end up with what some would consider as inappropriate humor. We might see it on television or in a movie where it is shocking and funny. In many real-life social circles, it is often highly offensive.

According to Goleman 2, empathy is our social radar as it requires being able to read another’s emotions; at a higher level, it entails sensing and responding to a person’s unspoken concerns or feelings. At the highest levels, empathy is understanding the issues or concerns that lie behind another’s feelings.” ( 2, p. 4) thus the review is important and its major purpose is to examine the relevancy of social radar in the workplace.

2. Theorization Framework for the Social Rader Discourses

This review employs the Goleman Theory whose assertion is that Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a more important factor than Intelligent Quotient (IQ) to enjoying a successful life and maintaining fruitful and secure relationships with others 3. Goleman proposed a new definition of intelligence which included qualities such as optimism, self-control, and moral character, and suggests that unlike general intelligence, which is viewed as stable over time, EI can be learned and increased at any time during one’s life 3. He also proposes that EI has a moral dimension stating that “emotional literacy goes hand and hand with education for character and moral development and citizenship” ( 3, page 135). Goleman concludes by reiterating that emotional intelligence is “the ability to identify, assess, and control one’s own emotions, the emotions of others, and that of groups” ( 3, p.135). This advanced the development of a performance-based model of EQ to assess employee levels of emotional intelligence, as well as to identify areas of improvement.

3. Findings Arising out of the Reviewed Chapter of the Study

Social radar is sensing what others feel without saying so captures the essence of empathy. Others rarely tell us in words what they feel; instead, they tell us in their tone of voice, facial expression, and other nonverbal ways. The ability to sense these subtle communications builds on more basic competencies, particularly self-awareness and self-control. Without the ability to sense our feelings or to keep them from swamping us; we will be hopelessly out of touch with the moods of others.

Empathy is our social radar. Lacking such sensitivity, people are “off.” Being emotionally tone-deaf leads to social awkwardness, whether from misconstruing feelings or through a mechanical, out-of-tune bluntness that destroys rapport. At the very least, empathy requires being able to read another’s emotions; at a higher level, it entails sensing and responding to a person’s unspoken concerns or feelings. At the highest levels, empathy is understanding the issues or concerns that lie behind another’s feelings.

Daniel Goleman 2 listed empathy as one of the important components of emotional intelligence and stated it to be the most easily recognized dimension. A person can have the best training in the world, possess an incisive and analytical mind or even the supply of endless ideas, but still would not make a good leader. Goleman further argued that emotional intelligence not only distinguishes the most outstanding leaders but can also be linked with too strong performance. It is a common characteristic that people who are successful either as business leaders, teachers, parents, individuals, or any other given profession to be empathic. Empathic people can put themselves into the shoes of others and be able to see the world through the other person’s eye. Empathy is the ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people. It is the awareness of other people’s feelings, needs, and concerns 2. Empathy has been argued to be the most crucial factor of leaders due to the need to increase the use of teams, rapid change of globalization, and the need to retain talent 1. Leaders need empathy to be able to develop and keep their best people; the reasoning behind this is that when people leave an organization, they take the knowledge of their organization with them.

Empathy in leadership would involve the consideration of other people's feelings especially when making decisions and this may aid in the attraction and retention of talent and the ability to develop others. Empathy would also make a leader sensitive to the cross-cultural differences that exist in his/her organization and hence decision making would consider these differences. Empathic leaders would also lead their organizations into offering the best and quality service to their customers as their feelings and emotions are usually factored in before services are offered to them. Leading a team can prove to be a challenging exercise in that they comprise people with different emotions and are often charged with reaching a consensus. A good team leader would be able to sense and understand each and everyone’s viewpoints around the table. It is through empathy that a leader may be able to understand the emotional makeup of a team. Good leaders not only use empathy to sympathize with people around them but also use it to improve their companies in subtle or important ways.

Coaching and mentoring are gaining appeal in most companies with the need of developing skills in their staff. This is usually done through training programs or the procuring of external services. Emotional intelligence plays an important role in the coaching and mentoring of people. A coach or mentor, for this case the leader, has to read the feelings of their coaches and use that ability to gain the trust and credibility of their staff. Gardenswartz et al., 4 hold the view that emotional intelligence would help a mentor build strong relationships with their mentees or team members. A coach or mentor with emotional intelligence would have a better understanding and the ability to manage emotions from their athletes and themselves. Gaining mutual trust between the coach and the athlete is the principal importance of a successful coaching or mentoring program.

Diversity in an organization would enrich its ability to respond to its customers or stakeholders with more innovative and creative products and solutions hence the need of applying emotional intelligence in building and maintaining relationships. Social awareness would enable a leader to understand the emotions of their team members. Empathy would enable a leader to maximize the diversity of his/her team members since this offers an opportunity for the cultivation of different opportunities. Emotional intelligence would also enable a leader to deal positively with the inherent threatening existence of dealing with people from different cultures and with different beliefs.

4. Suppositions and Conclusion

The chapter review concludes that empathic leaders with good people skills (social radar) know intuitively how to build bridges to others so that relationship bonds are robust. They are adept at engaging others and getting desirable responses from them. They know how to win people over and appeal to different audiences to build consensus and support. This type of influence is essential in achieving goals and outcomes. Empathy is crucial for exerting influence, but the first step in persuasion is building rapport. Rapport is that ethereal component that draws someone towards you so that a relationship can begin to form and trust takes root. Powerful communicators are leaders who listen openly and send compelling messages. They create a workplace atmosphere that is open, transparent, and consistent. Listening well is the key to empathy, but also accounts for about a third of the high rankings that employees give their bosses as effective communicators.

5. Recommendations

This review recommends that for people to have the best social radar, should strive to master the following;

• Listening well; Give their full and undivided attention, with listening they really can’t do two things at once. They listen carefully and with empathy thus, they become more aware of social cues which guide their behavior.

• Gaining perspective; Often people with weak social radars are only aware of their agenda. What is in it for themselves, and giving very little understanding or consideration for another’s perspective. Those with social radar work harder to understand others' perspectives.

• Giving help; Lead by being considerate of others first. They are respectful and strive to help out. Their goal is to improve their comfort level while becoming more aware and sensitive to their needs.

References

[1]  Goleman, D., Boyatzis, R. E., & McKee, A. (2004). Primal leadership: Realizing the power of emotional intelligence. Boston, Mass: Harvard Business School Press.
In article      
 
[2]  Goleman, D. (1998). Working with emotional intelligence. New York, NY: Bantam Dell.
In article      View Article
 
[3]  Karafyllis, N. C. &Ulshofer, G. (2008). Sexualized brains: Scientific modeling of emotional intelligence from a cultural perspective. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
In article      View Article
 
[4]  Gardenswartz, L., Cherbosque, J., & Rowe, A. (2008). Emotional intelligence for managing results in a diverse world: The hard truth about soft skills in the workplace. Mountain View, Calif: Davies-Black Pub.
In article      
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2022 Kintu Godfrey, Musiime Joseline, Muweesi Charles, Mugabo Augustine, Disan Kuteesa Mugyenyi and Achan Nancy

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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Normal Style
Kintu Godfrey, Musiime Joseline, Muweesi Charles, Mugabo Augustine, Disan Kuteesa Mugyenyi, Achan Nancy. Social Radar as a Necessity in the School Workplace: Review of Goleman’s Reinforcements on Emotional Intelligence. American Journal of Educational Research. Vol. 10, No. 4, 2022, pp 179-181. http://pubs.sciepub.com/education/10/4/3
MLA Style
Godfrey, Kintu, et al. "Social Radar as a Necessity in the School Workplace: Review of Goleman’s Reinforcements on Emotional Intelligence." American Journal of Educational Research 10.4 (2022): 179-181.
APA Style
Godfrey, K. , Joseline, M. , Charles, M. , Augustine, M. , Mugyenyi, D. K. , & Nancy, A. (2022). Social Radar as a Necessity in the School Workplace: Review of Goleman’s Reinforcements on Emotional Intelligence. American Journal of Educational Research, 10(4), 179-181.
Chicago Style
Godfrey, Kintu, Musiime Joseline, Muweesi Charles, Mugabo Augustine, Disan Kuteesa Mugyenyi, and Achan Nancy. "Social Radar as a Necessity in the School Workplace: Review of Goleman’s Reinforcements on Emotional Intelligence." American Journal of Educational Research 10, no. 4 (2022): 179-181.
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[1]  Goleman, D., Boyatzis, R. E., & McKee, A. (2004). Primal leadership: Realizing the power of emotional intelligence. Boston, Mass: Harvard Business School Press.
In article      
 
[2]  Goleman, D. (1998). Working with emotional intelligence. New York, NY: Bantam Dell.
In article      View Article
 
[3]  Karafyllis, N. C. &Ulshofer, G. (2008). Sexualized brains: Scientific modeling of emotional intelligence from a cultural perspective. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
In article      View Article
 
[4]  Gardenswartz, L., Cherbosque, J., & Rowe, A. (2008). Emotional intelligence for managing results in a diverse world: The hard truth about soft skills in the workplace. Mountain View, Calif: Davies-Black Pub.
In article