Article Versions
Export Article
Cite this article
  • Normal Style
  • MLA Style
  • APA Style
  • Chicago Style
Editorial
Open Access Peer-reviewed

Will Precision Medicine Ever be A Possibility for Controlling Tuberculosis?

Somchai Bovornkitti
American Journal of Public Health Research. 2018, 6(2), 62-62. DOI: 10.12691/ajphr-6-2-7
Published online: March 22, 2018

Not long ago, the global epidemic of tuberculosis, the so-called “white plaque” was controlled by energetic medical practice. i.e., providing B.C.G. vaccination for newborns, as well as early diagnosis and proper treatment of infected persons. Unfortunately, though, recent episodes of tuberculosis have notably re-emerged and cases of chemotherapeutic resistance are prevailing. 1.

The reasons for such incidents have been sorted out and are as the follows :

(1) Epidemics of drug-resistant causative agents;

(2) Withering enthusiasm for controlling the disease, such as lagging public health activity in provision of B.C.G. vaccination, and in energetic therapeutic practice thereby, leaving cases of drug resistance and treatment failure to become drastic sources of infection; and,

(3) The inability to radically eradicate the infection, as compared to leprosy and smallpox.

Regarding public health activity, apart from revision in general practices, and/or seeking new inventions, new philosophies apply. Owing to the advances in molecular or genomic medicine, new fronts are open for “precision medicine” to target a variety of diseases, including microbial infections, such as tuberculosis, at molecular levels.

In the case of tuberculosis, this decision is based on the knowledge of innate resistance, susceptibility and possibly acquired factors that exist. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 In this regard, the mutated portions, or any malicious genes if present in the DNA helix strands, may possibly be removed by molecular technology, such as the CRISPR/Cas system 9, 10. The named practices can be instituted prenatally or at subsequent occasions as necessitated.

References

[1]  Bovornkitti, S. Tuberculosis situation in Thailand is deteriorating! Thammasat Medical Journal, 17: 669. 2017.
In article      
 
[2]  Pitukpakorn, M., Bovornkitti, S. Molecular Medicine. Buddhachinaraj Medical Journal, 33: 246-254.2016
In article      
 
[3]  Pitukpakorn, M., Bovornkitti, S. Susceptibility factors in the genesis of mesothelioma. Buddhachinaraj Medical Journal, 33: 255-257. 2016.
In article      View Article
 
[4]  Huang, S.X.L., Jaurand, M.C., Kamp, D.W., Whysner, J., Hei, T.K. Role of mutagenicity in mineral fiber-induced carcinogenicity and other diseases. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, 14(Part B): 179-245. 2011.
In article      View Article
 
[5]  Li, C.M., Cambell, S.J., Kumararatne, D.S., Bellamy, R., Ruwende, C., McAdam, K.P.W.J., et al. Association of a polymorphism in the P2X7 gene with tuberculosis in a Gambian population. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 186 (10) : 1458-1462.2002
In article      View Article
 
[6]  Yim, J-J., Lee, H.W., Lee, H.S., Kim, Y.W., Han, S.K., Shim, Y-S., Holland, S.M. The association between microsatellite polymorphisms in intron II of human Toll-like receptor 2 gene and tuberculosis among Koreans. Genes and Immunity, 7: 150-155. 2006.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[7]  Azad, A.K., Sadee, W., Schlesinger, L.S. Innate immune gene polymorphisms in tuberculosis. Infection and Immunity, 80 (10) : 3343-3359. 2012.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[8]  Blischak, J.D., Tailleux, L., Myrthil, M.,Charlois, C., Bergot, E., Dinh, A., et al. Predicting susceptibility to tuberculosis based on gene expression profiling in dendritic cells. Scientific Reports 7, Article number: 5702(2017). [online] Available at: https//www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-05878-w. [Accessed 16 November 2017].
In article      View Article
 
[9]  Pitukpakorn, M., Bovornkitti, S. Molecular Scissors. Buddhachinaraj Medical Journal, 33: 241-243.2016.
In article      
 
[10]  Pitukpakorn, M., Bovornkitti, S. CRISPR/Cas: The Molecular Scissors. Thammasat Medical Journal, 17: 458-461. 2017.
In article      View Article
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2018 Somchai Bovornkitti

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Cite this article:

Normal Style
Somchai Bovornkitti. Will Precision Medicine Ever be A Possibility for Controlling Tuberculosis?. American Journal of Public Health Research. Vol. 6, No. 2, 2018, pp 62-62. http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajphr/6/2/7
MLA Style
Bovornkitti, Somchai. "Will Precision Medicine Ever be A Possibility for Controlling Tuberculosis?." American Journal of Public Health Research 6.2 (2018): 62-62.
APA Style
Bovornkitti, S. (2018). Will Precision Medicine Ever be A Possibility for Controlling Tuberculosis?. American Journal of Public Health Research, 6(2), 62-62.
Chicago Style
Bovornkitti, Somchai. "Will Precision Medicine Ever be A Possibility for Controlling Tuberculosis?." American Journal of Public Health Research 6, no. 2 (2018): 62-62.
Share
[1]  Bovornkitti, S. Tuberculosis situation in Thailand is deteriorating! Thammasat Medical Journal, 17: 669. 2017.
In article      
 
[2]  Pitukpakorn, M., Bovornkitti, S. Molecular Medicine. Buddhachinaraj Medical Journal, 33: 246-254.2016
In article      
 
[3]  Pitukpakorn, M., Bovornkitti, S. Susceptibility factors in the genesis of mesothelioma. Buddhachinaraj Medical Journal, 33: 255-257. 2016.
In article      View Article
 
[4]  Huang, S.X.L., Jaurand, M.C., Kamp, D.W., Whysner, J., Hei, T.K. Role of mutagenicity in mineral fiber-induced carcinogenicity and other diseases. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, 14(Part B): 179-245. 2011.
In article      View Article
 
[5]  Li, C.M., Cambell, S.J., Kumararatne, D.S., Bellamy, R., Ruwende, C., McAdam, K.P.W.J., et al. Association of a polymorphism in the P2X7 gene with tuberculosis in a Gambian population. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 186 (10) : 1458-1462.2002
In article      View Article
 
[6]  Yim, J-J., Lee, H.W., Lee, H.S., Kim, Y.W., Han, S.K., Shim, Y-S., Holland, S.M. The association between microsatellite polymorphisms in intron II of human Toll-like receptor 2 gene and tuberculosis among Koreans. Genes and Immunity, 7: 150-155. 2006.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[7]  Azad, A.K., Sadee, W., Schlesinger, L.S. Innate immune gene polymorphisms in tuberculosis. Infection and Immunity, 80 (10) : 3343-3359. 2012.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[8]  Blischak, J.D., Tailleux, L., Myrthil, M.,Charlois, C., Bergot, E., Dinh, A., et al. Predicting susceptibility to tuberculosis based on gene expression profiling in dendritic cells. Scientific Reports 7, Article number: 5702(2017). [online] Available at: https//www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-05878-w. [Accessed 16 November 2017].
In article      View Article
 
[9]  Pitukpakorn, M., Bovornkitti, S. Molecular Scissors. Buddhachinaraj Medical Journal, 33: 241-243.2016.
In article      
 
[10]  Pitukpakorn, M., Bovornkitti, S. CRISPR/Cas: The Molecular Scissors. Thammasat Medical Journal, 17: 458-461. 2017.
In article      View Article