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Emotional Maturity and Social Adjustment among Adolescent Students in East Coast Region of Tamil Nadu, India

N. Sasikumar , P. Nagooran
American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2021, 9(1), 36-40. DOI: 10.12691/ajap-9-1-5
Received October 17, 2021; Revised November 23, 2021; Accepted December 03, 2021

Abstract

The aim of this study is to know the relationship between emotional maturity and Social adjustment among Adolescent Students in East Coast Region of Tamil Nadu, India. The present study, a random sampling technique 200 adolescent students of Class IX from 3 Government schools and 3 Government aided schools in Ramanathapuram District, east coast region of Tamil Nadu, India and utilized as subjects of this study. Survey method was used. This study is intended to find out the levels of Emotional Maturity and Social Adjustment of adolescent Students and if there is any significant difference between the selected pairs of sub-samples. The study attempts to analyze the various aspects of emotional maturity and social adjustment among adolescent students. Two variables were discussed in the study and it will be taken care by the investigate for further studies. It is the dire need of the hour that as adolescent students we should have proper emotional development to rightly use our human emotions. Emotional maturity and social adjustment is a tool for promoting students mental health and personality. The findings of this study will be an eye opening to the researchers, curriculum practitioners and parents.

1. Introduction

Adolescence is a major period in the life and major changes takes place because of the transitions from the childhood to adulthood. The major changes are biological, cognitive, social and emotional, moral.etc. This study focuses on emotional maturity and social adjustment, and both are important variables which should be discussed on adolescence. Emotional maturity helps the child to learn some traits like self awareness, honesty, patience, truth, flexibility, self control and accountability, etc. Emotional maturity helps the individual to have positive and realistic view of their life which is essential in this era of modernization, globalization and liberalization.

2. Emotional Maturity

Emotional maturity is the ability of adolescents to stabilize emotions which include their capability for Emotional progression, Independence, Social adjustment, Emotional stability, Personality integration, etc. 17. According to Walter D. Smitson "Emotional maturity is a process in which the personality is continuously striving for greater sense of emotions, health, both inter and intra personally” 22. “Emotional maturity can be defined as a process in which the personality is always determined for better sense of emotional well-being” 19. Emotional maturity is a state of having reached an adult level of emotional development which implies emotional control in social situation. Emotional maturity is considered as one of the major determinant in shaping an individual’s personality, behavior and attitudes and it helps in enhancing the relationship with others and to enhance the self-worth of the person and emotional stability is considered as one of the major component in mental health 2. “The degree to which person has realized his potential for richness of living and has developed his capacity to enjoy things, to relate himself to others, to love and to laugh; his capacity for whole hearted sorrow, when an occasion arises and his capacity to show fear when there is occasion to be frightened, without feeling a need to use a false mask of courage, such as must be assumed by persons afraid to admit that they are afraid” 15.

3. Social Adjustment

Social adjustment is an effort made by an individual to cope with standards, values and needs of a society in order to be accepted. It can be defined as a psychological process. It involves coping with new standard and value. In the technical language of psychology “getting along with the members of society as best one can” is called adjustment. Adjustment with school life is considered one of the main indicators of success in school life as it is an indicator for the student’s ability to face the problems resulting from fulfilling hid academic, social and emotional needs 21. Through achieving adjustment with school life the students will be able to form a kind of good relationships with others in the school leading them to enhance their academic achievement.

Moreover, adjustment with school life can be a strong indicator of the academic level of the students from one hand and the level of social relations development and achieving personal goals from the other hand. Adjustment is a process by which living organisms satisfy their needs and circumstances. It is the process of establishing satisfactory relationship between an individual and his environment. It refers to the interaction between the internal demands and external demands of an individual. A person is said to be adjusted to the extent that maintains a balance between the personal and the environmental demands. According to Cronbach a well - adjusted person is one who commits oneself to socially desirable goals and uses his energies effectively in working towards them 5. Gupta and Gupta found that female children were better in social adjustments while in educational adjustments boys and girls have the same order of adjustment 11.

The concept mature emotional behaviour at any level is that which rejects the fruits of normal emotional development. It is a stage, which is very essential in human life. One of the major aims of any good educational programme is to help the learner to gain emotional maturity. College students do not have much emotional maturity because of their inadequate control over the environment. A mature adult due to the development of their various powers has greater control over their environment. So, possesses emotional maturity to a greater degree.

4. Objectives

1. To study the emotional maturity and social adjustment of adolescent students.

2. To find out the relationship between emotional maturity and social adjustment of adolescent students.

5. Hypotheses

H1 There is no significant difference in the level of emotional maturity of adolescent students with respect to Gender, Type of School Management, Medium of Instruction, Locality of Residence, Type of Family, Parents Educational Qualification and Parents Income.

H2 There is no significant difference in the level of social adjustment of adolescent students with respect to Gender, Type of School Management, Medium of Instruction, Locality of Residence, Type of Family, Parents Educational Qualification and Parents Income.

H3 There is no significant relationship between emotional maturity and social adjustment of adolescent students.

6. Variables

The present investigation is an attempt to study the “Emotional maturity and Social adjustment of adolescent students. The variables involved are:

6.1. Emotional maturity and

6.2. Social adjustment.

7. Methodology

7.1. Method

The investigator adopted the survey method of research as it is most suitable for the present study.

7.2. Population

The investigator was selected the adolescent students (secondary Level school students of Class IX) of Ramanathapuram district, Tamilnadu, India as the population.

7.3. Sample

The present study, using a random sampling technique selected 200 adolescent students of Class IX from 3 Government schools and 3 Government aided schools in Ramanathapuram District, east coast region of Tamil Nadu, India and utilized as subjects of this study. The sample were manipulated by using the Intervening variables viz, gender, type of school management, medium of instruction, locality of residence, type of family, parents educational qualification and parents income.

7.4. Tools

Emotional intelligence Scale was developed and validated by the researcher and Social adjustment Scale was developed and validated by the researcher.

8. Delimitation of the Study

1. In the present study, only adolescent students those who have been studying in class IX were selected.

2. This study is confined only to 3 Government schools and 3 Government aided schools in Ramanathapuram District, Tamil Nadu, India.

3. The study was conducted on a random of 200 samples of adolescent students in East Coast Region of Ramanathapuram District, Tamil Nadu, India.

9. Procedure

The investigator selected adolescent students in six schools using random sampling technique. A group of ninth standard students from each school was selected in a random manner. Thus the researcher used simple random sampling technique for collection of data from the East Coast Region of Ramanathapuram District, Tamil Nadu, India. The investigator went to various schools located in Coast Region of Ramanathapuram District and collected 200 sample from the adolescent students. The responses of the respondents were recorded and the adolescent students’ personal particulars were collected through questionnaire. The collected data were used for analysis of data.

10. Result and Findings

  • Table 1. ‘t’ values between the mean score of adolescent students with respect to emotional maturity from different Intervening variables

1. There is significant difference between male and female students, Government and Government Aided schools adolescent students with respect to their emotional maturity.

2. There is no significant difference between Tamil medium and English medium students, costal rural residence and rural area residence students, nuclear and joint family of adolescent students with respect to their emotional maturity.

From the above table, it is observed that the calculated ‘f’ value 1.63 is less than the table value 2.65 at 0.05 level of significant. Hence, it’s found that there is no significant difference among adolescent students in their emotional maturity with respect to parent’s educational qualification.

1. There is significant difference between male and female adolescent students with respect to their social adjustment.

2. There is no significant difference between Government and Government Aided school students, Tamil medium and English medium students, costal rural residence and rural area residence students, nuclear and joint family of adolescent students with respect to their social adjustment.

From the above table, it is observed that the calculated ‘f’ value 0.52 is less than the table value 2.65 at 0.05 level of significant. Hence, it is found that there is no significant difference among adolescent students with respect to their social adjustment.

Pearson correlation of Emotional Maturity and social adjustment = 0.367. P-Value = 0.000. In conclusion, the result indicate that the strength of association between the variables is not high (r = 0.367), and that the correlation coefficient is not significantly different from zero (P < 0.001). Also, it indicate that 14% (0.3672) of the variation in Emotional Maturity and social adjustment.

The findings in this study indicate a positive relationship between emotional maturity and social adjustment. It is clear that the mean scores between the variables taken for this study are non significant except for gender and type of management with respect to emotional maturity among adolescent students.

11. Educational Implications

1. The result of the present study can be usefully employed in school practice. The present study has the following implications for the school teachers, parents, counsellors and students.

2. In this modern age the teachers try to know the adjustment level of students; a teacher with the knowledge of their adjustment can improve and develop students in positive direction, because adjustment can be modified.

3. Managing one’s own emotions is a huge task for a growing adult. Lot of young people are facing both development as well as social adjustment and challenges today. The pressure is immense on both the academic goals and emotional challenges.

4. Emotional maturity with respect to social and emotional learning processes are the need of the hour in schools today.

5. Emotional well-being, positively predict not only academic achievement but also satisfactory and productive experiences in the world of social adjustment and human relationships.

6. The researcher in the present study made an attempt to understand the growing emotional challenges of secondary school students with respect to coping management of destructive emotions.

7. The life skills education program is a big attempt in most of the schools today with regard to social and emotional development of students.

8. Knowing oneself through the social and emotional learning program is an eye opener for students in this study. A lot of such programs need to be a part of school mental health. Skills like empathy, co-operation, self control, and responsibility are the four essentials in the social and emotional learning of students.

9. Coping with management of destructive emotions is very important as a part of emotional development. Schools today have entered into a curriculum development program where equal importance is given to life skills and attitude development along with scholastic grades and achievements.

12. Suggestions for Further Research

From the findings of the study and on the basis of the observations made by the investigator during the study, a few recommendations are made for further researches.

1. The present study was delimited to students of class IX of six schools only. The students from other classes too could be identified for management of destructive emotions as emotional enhancement and emotional literacy can be seen across all age groups.

2. Further research may be conducted on the interpersonal relationships and emotional learning in associate environmental influences.

3. The same study may be undertaken with group learning, focusing on individuals for a longer period of time to yield better results on emotional enhancement and social adjustment.

13. Conclusion

Emotional maturity and social adjustment is very essential in the educational field. They should be promoted in the minds of the students to improve their educational status without fear. This research found that the following factors are affecting the emotional maturity and self concept such as hereditary factors, maturation, training, health, intelligence, family relationship, social environment and control over emotions, on other hand social adjustment is affected by factors like age, appearance, gender, culture, economical status, environment, and parents education. The knowledge of social adjustment and emotional maturity level may help the students to improve their adjustment, so that they can lead the society in a better way. Parents awareness about the social adjustment level of their children can be very helpful for their further development. The knowledge of social adjustment and emotional maturity may help the students in making right vocational choice. Through adjustment study the counsellor may know about the various levels of adjustment and emotional maturity in students which will help him in solving their problems.

References

[1]  Adeyemo, D. A. (2005). The Buffering Effect of Emotional Intelligence Adjustment on the Adjustment of Secondary School Students in Transition. Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology, 6(2), 79-90.
In article      
 
[2]  Anand, A., N, K., &and Kumar, A. (2014, November). Impact of different factors on Emotional Maturity of adolescents of Coed-School. International Research Journal of Social Sciences, 3(11), 17-19.
In article      
 
[3]  Bai, S. (2011). Study of Anxiety Proneness and Emotional Intelligence in Relation to Academic Achievement of Pre-university Students. International Referred Research Journal, II (22), ISSN-0975-3486.
In article      
 
[4]  Chauhan, S. (1984). Advanced Educational Psychology. Delhi, Delhi: Vani Educational Books.
In article      
 
[5]  Cronbach, L.J. (1953). Correlation between persons as a research tool. In : O. H. Mowrer (Ed.), Psychotherapy: Theory and research. Ronald, New York pp. 376-389.
In article      View Article
 
[6]  Dasgupta, M. (2011). Emotional Intelligence as a mediator of Work-family Role conflict, quality of work life & Happiness among IT professionals. Journal of the Indian Academy of Appliedpsychology, 37, 257-262.
In article      
 
[7]  DhimanKar (2016), Emotional intelligence and adjustment ability among higher secondary school students: A Correlational Study, American Journal of Social Sciences, 2016; 4(4): 34-37.
In article      
 
[8]  Engelberg, E. and Sjoberg, L. (2004). Emotional Intelligence, affect Intensity, and Social Adjustment. Personality andIndividual Differences, 37, 533-542.
In article      View Article
 
[9]  Farn, S. C, Ying M. L and Chia, A. T., (2006). A Study of the Emotional Intelligence and Adjustment Behaviour of High School Students. World Transaction on Engineering and Technology Education; Vol. 5 (3) 473-476.
In article      
 
[10]  Goleman, D, (2001). Emotional Intelligence: Issues in Paradigm Building. In C. Cherniss & D. Goleman, The Emotionally Intelligent Workplace, 13-26. San Francisco:Jossey-Bass.
In article      
 
[11]  Gupta, M. & Gupta, R. (2011). Adjustment and scholastic achievement of boys and girls. VSRD International Journal of Business and Management Research, 1, 20-26.
In article      
 
[12]  HossienJenaabadi (2015), Comparing emotional creativity and social adjustment of gifted and normal students, Advances in Applied Sociology, 111-118.
In article      View Article
 
[13]  Jersild, A.T. The Psychology of Adolescents. Toronto: The Macmillan Company. 1963.
In article      
 
[14]  Kumawat, S.R. (2012). A Study of Emotional Maturity in Post Graduate Students of Vocational Education. International Indexed & Referred Research Journal, ISSN 0974-2832, RNI- RAJBIL- 2009/29954; Vol.4(46)
In article      
 
[15]  M. Panimalar Roja, N. Sasikumar, and M. Parimala Fathima, “A Study on Emotional Maturity and Self Concept at Higher Secondary Level.” Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences 1, no. 5 (2013): 81-83.
In article      
 
[16]  Mahmoudi, A. (2012). Emotional maturity and adjustment level of college students. Edu. Res. J., 2(1):18-19.
In article      
 
[17]  Molly Joy and Asha Mathew (2018). Emotional Maturity and General Well-Being of Adolescents, IOSR Journal Of Pharmacy Volume 8, Issue 5 Version. I (May 2018), PP. 01-06.
In article      
 
[18]  N. Sasikumar, and R. Bapitha, “Examination Stress and Academic Achievement in English of Ninth Standard Students in Pudukottai Educational District.” American Journal of Educational Research, vol. 7, no. 9 (2019): 654-659.
In article      
 
[19]  Rajeshwari, R., & S, J. (2015, November). Opening of New Insights for the Researchers: A Descriptive Study on Emotional Maturity. IJEMR, 5(11), 1, 5-7.
In article      
 
[20]  Saini R. (2012). Career maturity of adolescents in relation to their Emotional Maturity, Multidisciplinary Journal of Research, vol.5(2), pp.35-39.
In article      
 
[21]  Sasikumar and Jeyakumari (2018), Emotional Intelligence and Social Adjustment among Adolescent Students, American Journal of Social Science Research, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2018, pp. 16-21
In article      
 
[22]  Smitson, W.S. (1974). The meaning of emotional maturity. MH, Winter 58, 9-11.
In article      
 
[23]  Vandana Chauhan (2013). A study on adjustment of higher secondary school students of drug district; OSR Journal of Research & Method in Education (IOSR-JRME) e-ISSN: 2320–7388, p-ISSN: 2320–737X Volume 1, Issue 1, PP 50-52.
In article      View Article
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2021 N. Sasikumar and P. Nagooran

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Cite this article:

Normal Style
N. Sasikumar, P. Nagooran. Emotional Maturity and Social Adjustment among Adolescent Students in East Coast Region of Tamil Nadu, India. American Journal of Applied Psychology. Vol. 9, No. 1, 2021, pp 36-40. http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajap/9/1/5
MLA Style
Sasikumar, N., and P. Nagooran. "Emotional Maturity and Social Adjustment among Adolescent Students in East Coast Region of Tamil Nadu, India." American Journal of Applied Psychology 9.1 (2021): 36-40.
APA Style
Sasikumar, N. , & Nagooran, P. (2021). Emotional Maturity and Social Adjustment among Adolescent Students in East Coast Region of Tamil Nadu, India. American Journal of Applied Psychology, 9(1), 36-40.
Chicago Style
Sasikumar, N., and P. Nagooran. "Emotional Maturity and Social Adjustment among Adolescent Students in East Coast Region of Tamil Nadu, India." American Journal of Applied Psychology 9, no. 1 (2021): 36-40.
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  • Table 1. ‘t’ values between the mean score of adolescent students with respect to emotional maturity from different Intervening variables
  • Table 2. ‘F’ value among various category of Parent’s Educational Qualification of adolescent students with respect to emotional maturity
  • Table 3. ‘t’ values between the mean score of adolescent students with respect to e social adjustment from different Intervening variables
  • Table 4. ‘F’ value among various category of Parent’s Educational Qualification of adolescent students with respect to social adjustment
[1]  Adeyemo, D. A. (2005). The Buffering Effect of Emotional Intelligence Adjustment on the Adjustment of Secondary School Students in Transition. Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology, 6(2), 79-90.
In article      
 
[2]  Anand, A., N, K., &and Kumar, A. (2014, November). Impact of different factors on Emotional Maturity of adolescents of Coed-School. International Research Journal of Social Sciences, 3(11), 17-19.
In article      
 
[3]  Bai, S. (2011). Study of Anxiety Proneness and Emotional Intelligence in Relation to Academic Achievement of Pre-university Students. International Referred Research Journal, II (22), ISSN-0975-3486.
In article      
 
[4]  Chauhan, S. (1984). Advanced Educational Psychology. Delhi, Delhi: Vani Educational Books.
In article      
 
[5]  Cronbach, L.J. (1953). Correlation between persons as a research tool. In : O. H. Mowrer (Ed.), Psychotherapy: Theory and research. Ronald, New York pp. 376-389.
In article      View Article
 
[6]  Dasgupta, M. (2011). Emotional Intelligence as a mediator of Work-family Role conflict, quality of work life & Happiness among IT professionals. Journal of the Indian Academy of Appliedpsychology, 37, 257-262.
In article      
 
[7]  DhimanKar (2016), Emotional intelligence and adjustment ability among higher secondary school students: A Correlational Study, American Journal of Social Sciences, 2016; 4(4): 34-37.
In article      
 
[8]  Engelberg, E. and Sjoberg, L. (2004). Emotional Intelligence, affect Intensity, and Social Adjustment. Personality andIndividual Differences, 37, 533-542.
In article      View Article
 
[9]  Farn, S. C, Ying M. L and Chia, A. T., (2006). A Study of the Emotional Intelligence and Adjustment Behaviour of High School Students. World Transaction on Engineering and Technology Education; Vol. 5 (3) 473-476.
In article      
 
[10]  Goleman, D, (2001). Emotional Intelligence: Issues in Paradigm Building. In C. Cherniss & D. Goleman, The Emotionally Intelligent Workplace, 13-26. San Francisco:Jossey-Bass.
In article      
 
[11]  Gupta, M. & Gupta, R. (2011). Adjustment and scholastic achievement of boys and girls. VSRD International Journal of Business and Management Research, 1, 20-26.
In article      
 
[12]  HossienJenaabadi (2015), Comparing emotional creativity and social adjustment of gifted and normal students, Advances in Applied Sociology, 111-118.
In article      View Article
 
[13]  Jersild, A.T. The Psychology of Adolescents. Toronto: The Macmillan Company. 1963.
In article      
 
[14]  Kumawat, S.R. (2012). A Study of Emotional Maturity in Post Graduate Students of Vocational Education. International Indexed & Referred Research Journal, ISSN 0974-2832, RNI- RAJBIL- 2009/29954; Vol.4(46)
In article      
 
[15]  M. Panimalar Roja, N. Sasikumar, and M. Parimala Fathima, “A Study on Emotional Maturity and Self Concept at Higher Secondary Level.” Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences 1, no. 5 (2013): 81-83.
In article      
 
[16]  Mahmoudi, A. (2012). Emotional maturity and adjustment level of college students. Edu. Res. J., 2(1):18-19.
In article      
 
[17]  Molly Joy and Asha Mathew (2018). Emotional Maturity and General Well-Being of Adolescents, IOSR Journal Of Pharmacy Volume 8, Issue 5 Version. I (May 2018), PP. 01-06.
In article      
 
[18]  N. Sasikumar, and R. Bapitha, “Examination Stress and Academic Achievement in English of Ninth Standard Students in Pudukottai Educational District.” American Journal of Educational Research, vol. 7, no. 9 (2019): 654-659.
In article      
 
[19]  Rajeshwari, R., & S, J. (2015, November). Opening of New Insights for the Researchers: A Descriptive Study on Emotional Maturity. IJEMR, 5(11), 1, 5-7.
In article      
 
[20]  Saini R. (2012). Career maturity of adolescents in relation to their Emotional Maturity, Multidisciplinary Journal of Research, vol.5(2), pp.35-39.
In article      
 
[21]  Sasikumar and Jeyakumari (2018), Emotional Intelligence and Social Adjustment among Adolescent Students, American Journal of Social Science Research, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2018, pp. 16-21
In article      
 
[22]  Smitson, W.S. (1974). The meaning of emotional maturity. MH, Winter 58, 9-11.
In article      
 
[23]  Vandana Chauhan (2013). A study on adjustment of higher secondary school students of drug district; OSR Journal of Research & Method in Education (IOSR-JRME) e-ISSN: 2320–7388, p-ISSN: 2320–737X Volume 1, Issue 1, PP 50-52.
In article      View Article