Article Versions
Export Article
Cite this article
  • Normal Style
  • MLA Style
  • APA Style
  • Chicago Style
Research Article
Open Access Peer-reviewed

Distribution Pattern of Some Ethnomedicinal Plants of Mayali in Jashpur District

Sangeeta Yadav , Lata Sharma
Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences. 2021, 9(11), 950-953. DOI: 10.12691/aees-9-11-6
Received September 27, 2021; Revised October 28, 2021; Accepted November 05, 2021

Abstract

Present study aimed to compare the distribution pattern and trends of medicinal plants. Present work was focused on the study of relationship of local people with indigenous plants and the documentation of indigenous their knowledge on how local plant resources are utilized to cure different diseases. The field work was carried out in two distinct sites for studying both distribution pattern and folk medicinal uses of plants. A total of ten quadrates in Mayali site were used to calculate phytosociological characteristics (Frequency, density, abundance and important value index). During the present investigation fifteen ethnomedicinal plants species families were document from Mayali site situated at Jashpur district. Cynodon dactylon, Bambusa vulgaris, Alkana tinctoria, Senna tora and Crnum latifoliumi exhibited maximum value of RF, RD, RM and IVI at Mayali site. The outcome of present research work was the documented plant diversity of at Mayali site that could generate further research activities and will help the upcoming generations to conserve ethno-medicinal knowledge of medicinal herbs for the benefit to society and ecosystem.

1. Introduction

Jashpur district lies in the north-eastern corner of the central Indian state of Chhattisgarh adjoining the border of Jharkhand and Odisha. Jashpur nagar is the administrative headquarters of the district. It is placed among valleys and surrounded with lush green environment. Jashpur nagar is nearest town to Mayali which is approximately 35 km away. The village Mayali in Jashpur district situated in Chhattisgarh state, with a population 682. The size of the area is about 6.12 square kilometer. The studies of the interrelation of Phytosociological characters represent the status of plant diversity 1. The present investigation was carried out on phytosociological and species diversity in the Mayali district of Jashpur. The main purpose of the phytosociological is to understand floristic vegetation characteristics to estimate the species richness and diversity existing in the study area.

2. Materials and Methods

The research methodology of present study was adopted from Kanuajia et al. 2, Krishna et al. 3, Negi and Nautiyal 4, Ojha 5, Pielou 6 and Srinivsa Rao et al. 7 with slight modification as per authors research knowledge.

2.1. Study Area

The present study area was Jashpur district in Chhattisgarh state which is a tribal area. The geographical area of Jashpur district is 5737.00 sq. km. The South-North length of this study area is about to 150 km and its West-East breath is 85 km. Mayali is located in Kunkuri Tehsil of Jashpur district in Chhattisgarh, India. It is situated 15 km away from sub district headquarter Kunkuri and 35 km away from district headquarter Jashpur nagar.

2.2. Survey Method

We conducted study in the rural areas of Mayali site that come under Jashpur district. We talked to the indigenous people about the native plants of that area, took pictures of each plants available in that area. Quadrate method (at a square of 100 X 100 cm) was used to study the diversity of medicinal plants including herbs, shrubs and trees of Mayali site during rainy, winter and summer season. Phytosociological studies were carried out during 2019 to 2020 to cover all spectrum all vegetation. Ten-quadrate were randomly selected from different sites of Mayali village. Number of species and number of individual in each quadrate were recorded. These observations were used to calculate Frequency, Density, Relative Density (RD), Abundance, Relative Dominance (RA) and Important Value Index (IVI) of each species.

2.3. Identification

Plant identification was done as per the morphological clues by comparing known plants with unknown plants. The objectives of the present study were to stratify the vegetation into different type and to analyze the community structure for species (population structure, density, frequency, abundance and species girth class relationship). The following calculations were used for the assessment of major parameters included in Phytosociological studies of plants inhabited in specific inhabitation.

3. Results

The present research work was conducted to assess the phytosociological study of Mayali site of Jashpur district to understand the floristic vegetation characteristics, species richness and diversity exist in the study area. The Mayali site of Jashpur district is shown in Figure 1. A total of 20 species of medicinal plant (hearb, shurb and tree) have been recorded in Mayali site of Jashpur district. These species have been belonged to fifteen families and widely used by indigenous society to cure different diseases. The present investigations have revealed that twenty leafy plants were distributed over fifteen families. These have occupied various life forms and out of them thirteen were tree species, one was shrub species and six were herb species (Table 1). The phytosociological study was carried out using primary data obtained from field survey which revealed that the maximum density of Bambusa vulgaris and Crinum lotifolium. The frequency measurements emphasized the importance of distribution of individuals belonging to a particular species in the vegetation sampled. Therefore, species diversity is considered as the best measures of community structure. Observations divulged that among twenty observed ethno medicinal plants i.e., Cynodon dactylon, Bambusa vulgaris, Alkana tinctoria, Senna tora and Crnum latifoliumi exhibited maximum value of RF, RD, RM and IVI while Tasmanian pepper, Ficus religiosa have shown minimum value of RF, RD, RM and IVI (Table 2).

  • Table 1. List of medicinal plants documented as per the knowledge of indigenous respondents (peoples) of Mayali village Kunkuri Tehsil of Jashpur district (Chhattisgarh)

  • Table 2. Phytosociology of medicinal plant species documented during Rainy, Winter and Summer season (from 2019 to 2020) in Mayali village Kunkuri Tehsil of Jashpur district (Chhattisgarh)

4. Discussion

The phytosociology study of plant vegetation deals with the composition, development and the relationship between the species among plant communities. Similar kind of studies have been done i.e., Prajapati et al. 8 conducted a research in tropical dry deciduous forest of Jashpur district of Chhattisgarh state, Painkara et al. 9 assessed the tribal knowledge of medicinal plants of Jashpur district, Kurre 10 explored the variety of medicinal plants and their application inhabited in Jashpur District, Chatterjee 11 conducted ecological studies of the plant vegetation of Odgi Forest situated at Sarguja district. Recently, Yadav and Sharma 12 assessed the distribution Pattern of some Ethnomedicinal Plants at Kunkuri Tehsil of Jashpur District. However these studies need to be more insightful, in order to meet the need the present investigation has been initiated in Mayali village of Jashpur District. The Random distribution has been found in uniform environment only whereas the regular distribution occurs where the severe competition exists between plant species. Moreover, each species of a community plays a specific role and represent the definite quantitative relationship between abundant and rare species. The research analysis of primary data revealed six herb species were recorded in the study sites. The Cynodon dactylon exhibited the maximum IVI values at Mayali site. Certain literature claimed the variety of medicinal applications of C. dactylon. Recently, Singh et al. 13 advocated the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, wound-healing and immunomodulatory properties of C. dactylon (L.) and Savadi et al. 14 have been observed the significant antibacterial potential of methanolic extract of C. dactylon rhizomes against human pathogenic bacteria viz., Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. However, the more precise plant diversity needs to be explored in Jashpur District.

5. Conclusion

The phytosociology study of plant diversity in Chhattisgarh is still need to explore because this state has rich medicinal plant diversity that has been utilized for the indigenous peoples since long ago. The information of the application of plant species for specific utility is passed from one generation to another one. As they practice the routine utilization of plant species to maintain health and to cure diseases, thereby the indigenous peoples aware of the exact utility of their indigenous plant communities. The Cynodon dactylon exhibited the maximum IVI values at Mayali site and therefore it is emerged as dominant species of that ecosystem. Conclusively we observed low grazing pressure and moderate human impact on normal distribution of plant species which may cause reduction in plant diversity in the Mayali ecosystem. Hence the documentation and preservation of plant diversity plays a crucial role to maintain sustainable ecosystem. Such studies could generate the opportunities for further research activities and help the upcoming generation in pursuing ethno-botanical knowledge of different regions of Chhattisgarh state.

Acknowledgments

Authors would like to thank the local people for their kind cooperation and sharing the valuable information about indigenous plants. The authors are grateful to forest department of Jashpur district for providing support for field survey and documentation.

References

[1]  Curtis, J.T., McIntosh, R.P.C. (1950). The interrelation of certain analytical and synthetic Phytosociological characters. Ecology, 31, 434-435.
In article      View Article
 
[2]  Kanuajia, A, Daniel, S, Kishore, P, Singh, A.K., Patel, M. (2018). Dominance and distribution pattern of traditional pattern of traditional agroforestry trees in Garhwal Himalayas. J Pharmacogn. Phytochem, 7(4), 2459-2462.
In article      
 
[3]  Krishna, P.H., Reddy, C.S., Meena, S.L., Katewa, S.S. (2014). Pattern of plant species diversity in grasslands of Rajasthan, India. Taiwania, 59, 111-118.
In article      
 
[4]  Negi, C.S., Nautiyal, S. (2005). Phytosociological Studies of a Traditional reserve Forest Thal Ke Dhar, Pithoragarh, Central Himalaya, India. Indian forestry, 519-534.
In article      
 
[5]  Ojha, A. (2016). Ecological study of Tal Chhapar Sanctuary, Churu (Rajasthan). J. Glob Res., 327-31.
In article      
 
[6]  Pielou, E. C. (1966). The measurement of diversity in different types of biological collection. J. Theor. Biol., 13, 131-144.
In article      View Article
 
[7]  Srinivsa Rao, D., Prayaga Murthy, P., Aniel Kumar, O. (2014). Distribution of soil types, and soil types: A case study from the tropical forest of Eastern Ghats of Vizianagaram, Andhra Pradesh. India International Journal of diversity and conservation, 6(6), 488-494.
In article      View Article
 
[8]  Prajapati, S., Sharma, K., Singh, P. (2018). Plant diversity in tropical dry deciduous forests of Jashpur, Chhattisgarh with special reference to their ethnomedicinal uses. Tropical Ecology, 59(3), 505-514.
In article      
 
[9]  Painkara, V. K., Jhariya M. K., Raj A., (2015). Assessment of knowledge of medicinal plants and their use in tribal region of Jashpur district of Chhattisgarh, India. J. Appl. & Nat. Sci., 7 (1), 434-442.
In article      View Article
 
[10]  Kurre, R.K. (2015). Wide variety of medicinal plants and their uses in Jashpur District of Chhattisgarh. IOSR Journal of Environmental Science, Toxicology and Food Technology, 1(1), 01-05.
In article      
 
[11]  Chatterjee, A.K. (2014). Ecological studies of vegetation of Odgi Forest of Sarguja district, Chhattisgarh. International Journal on Advanced Computer Theory and Engineering, 3(3), 17-19.
In article      
 
[12]  Yadav, S., Sharma, L. (2021). Distribution Pattern of some Ethnomedicinal Plants of Kunkuri in Jashpur District. International Journal Current Research, 13(1), 15431-15434.
In article      
 
[13]  Singh, V., Singh, A., Singh, I. P., Kumar B. D. (2021). Phytomedicinal properties of Cynodon dactylon (L.) pers. (durva) in its traditional preparation and extracts. Phytomedicine Plus, 1(1).
In article      View Article
 
[14]  Savadi, S., Vazifedoost, M., Didar, Z., Nematshahi, M. M., Jahed, E. (2020). Phytochemical Analysis and Antimicrobial/Antioxidant Activity of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. Rhizome Methanolic Extract. Journal of Food Quality, 2020.
In article      View Article
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2021 Sangeeta Yadav and Lata Sharma

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Cite this article:

Normal Style
Sangeeta Yadav, Lata Sharma. Distribution Pattern of Some Ethnomedicinal Plants of Mayali in Jashpur District. Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Vol. 9, No. 11, 2021, pp 950-953. http://pubs.sciepub.com/aees/9/11/6
MLA Style
Yadav, Sangeeta, and Lata Sharma. "Distribution Pattern of Some Ethnomedicinal Plants of Mayali in Jashpur District." Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences 9.11 (2021): 950-953.
APA Style
Yadav, S. , & Sharma, L. (2021). Distribution Pattern of Some Ethnomedicinal Plants of Mayali in Jashpur District. Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences, 9(11), 950-953.
Chicago Style
Yadav, Sangeeta, and Lata Sharma. "Distribution Pattern of Some Ethnomedicinal Plants of Mayali in Jashpur District." Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences 9, no. 11 (2021): 950-953.
Share
  • Table 1. List of medicinal plants documented as per the knowledge of indigenous respondents (peoples) of Mayali village Kunkuri Tehsil of Jashpur district (Chhattisgarh)
  • Table 2. Phytosociology of medicinal plant species documented during Rainy, Winter and Summer season (from 2019 to 2020) in Mayali village Kunkuri Tehsil of Jashpur district (Chhattisgarh)
[1]  Curtis, J.T., McIntosh, R.P.C. (1950). The interrelation of certain analytical and synthetic Phytosociological characters. Ecology, 31, 434-435.
In article      View Article
 
[2]  Kanuajia, A, Daniel, S, Kishore, P, Singh, A.K., Patel, M. (2018). Dominance and distribution pattern of traditional pattern of traditional agroforestry trees in Garhwal Himalayas. J Pharmacogn. Phytochem, 7(4), 2459-2462.
In article      
 
[3]  Krishna, P.H., Reddy, C.S., Meena, S.L., Katewa, S.S. (2014). Pattern of plant species diversity in grasslands of Rajasthan, India. Taiwania, 59, 111-118.
In article      
 
[4]  Negi, C.S., Nautiyal, S. (2005). Phytosociological Studies of a Traditional reserve Forest Thal Ke Dhar, Pithoragarh, Central Himalaya, India. Indian forestry, 519-534.
In article      
 
[5]  Ojha, A. (2016). Ecological study of Tal Chhapar Sanctuary, Churu (Rajasthan). J. Glob Res., 327-31.
In article      
 
[6]  Pielou, E. C. (1966). The measurement of diversity in different types of biological collection. J. Theor. Biol., 13, 131-144.
In article      View Article
 
[7]  Srinivsa Rao, D., Prayaga Murthy, P., Aniel Kumar, O. (2014). Distribution of soil types, and soil types: A case study from the tropical forest of Eastern Ghats of Vizianagaram, Andhra Pradesh. India International Journal of diversity and conservation, 6(6), 488-494.
In article      View Article
 
[8]  Prajapati, S., Sharma, K., Singh, P. (2018). Plant diversity in tropical dry deciduous forests of Jashpur, Chhattisgarh with special reference to their ethnomedicinal uses. Tropical Ecology, 59(3), 505-514.
In article      
 
[9]  Painkara, V. K., Jhariya M. K., Raj A., (2015). Assessment of knowledge of medicinal plants and their use in tribal region of Jashpur district of Chhattisgarh, India. J. Appl. & Nat. Sci., 7 (1), 434-442.
In article      View Article
 
[10]  Kurre, R.K. (2015). Wide variety of medicinal plants and their uses in Jashpur District of Chhattisgarh. IOSR Journal of Environmental Science, Toxicology and Food Technology, 1(1), 01-05.
In article      
 
[11]  Chatterjee, A.K. (2014). Ecological studies of vegetation of Odgi Forest of Sarguja district, Chhattisgarh. International Journal on Advanced Computer Theory and Engineering, 3(3), 17-19.
In article      
 
[12]  Yadav, S., Sharma, L. (2021). Distribution Pattern of some Ethnomedicinal Plants of Kunkuri in Jashpur District. International Journal Current Research, 13(1), 15431-15434.
In article      
 
[13]  Singh, V., Singh, A., Singh, I. P., Kumar B. D. (2021). Phytomedicinal properties of Cynodon dactylon (L.) pers. (durva) in its traditional preparation and extracts. Phytomedicine Plus, 1(1).
In article      View Article
 
[14]  Savadi, S., Vazifedoost, M., Didar, Z., Nematshahi, M. M., Jahed, E. (2020). Phytochemical Analysis and Antimicrobial/Antioxidant Activity of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. Rhizome Methanolic Extract. Journal of Food Quality, 2020.
In article      View Article