Figure 2. (A) Structure of the PM3-optimized geometry of the [1.1.1] anionic bromide derivative. Note the intact C–Br bond. (B) Final structure observed upon B3LYP-optimization of the [2.2.2] anionic bromide. Note that the C–Br bond has been broken (the bromide ion is to the right of the structure) but no central propellane bond is formed. (C) Final structure observed upon B3LYP-optimization of the [3.2.2] anionic bromide. Note that the C–Br bond has been broken (the bromide ion has migrated behind the structure), and that in addition to the lack of a central propellane bond, one of the C2 bridges has broken to afford C=C bonds with the former bridgehead carbons

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Introduction of a Computational Chemistry Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) into an Advanced Organic Chemistry Lab: An Investigation of Propellane Formation

Phillip J. Alexander, Dillon Button-Jennings, Claudia N. Evans, Mason B. Hemstreet, Marissa E. Henager, Stephanie Jacob, Charles S. Jolly, Maayan R. Lantzman, Alexandra Saputo, Nolan R. Stager, Elizabeth L. Whitman, Bohdi J. Young, Gary W. Breton

World Journal of Chemical Education. 2021, 9(3), 88-93 doi:10.12691/wjce-9-3-4