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Building Rubrics for Evaluating the Competence of Preparing for Lesson Plans of Pedagogical Student

P.T. Huong , C.T.H. Linh
World Journal of Chemical Education. 2017, 5(5), 175-179. DOI: 10.12691/wjce-5-5-6
Published online: October 27, 2017

Abstract

This article explores the issue of evaluation in today's education, with particular emphasis on assessing learner competencies. The rubric building steps will be presented to assess the pedagogical students' teaching capacity with five steps: (1) Define the criteria for the preparation of lesson planning; (2) Define indicator of criteria; (3) Describe the level of the indicators; (4) assign points to indicator levels; (5) Find evidence for the criteria; (6) Perform evaluation. From that process, the paper described planning capacity with four criteria: Understanding students, Understanding curriculum, Understanding facilities, teaching aids, Understand the socio-economic and natural characteristics of locality. The criterion of Understanding students includes 3 indicators: Understanding the knowledge base of students’ subjects, Determine interest in learning Chemistry and Biology, Identifying learning styles of Chemistry and Biology. Understanding curriculum includes 2 indicators: Define goals, orientation methods, means and forms, teaching content of lessons during pedagogy practice, Identify teaching plan of the lessons during pedagogy practice. The criterion of Understanding facilities, teaching aids includes 2 indicators: Understanding facilities - teaching aids, Develop plans to use, purchase or make the lacking teaching aids. Understand the socio-economic and natural characteristics of locality includes 2 indicators: Only the socio-economic and natural characteristics of locality related to the content of teaching Biology, Integrate the socio-economic and natural characteristics of locality in teaching Chemistry and Biology. Each indicator is described in three levels: Level 1: Fail; level 2: standard and level 3: Good. Criteria are considered as a useful tool for assessing the teaching capacity of pedagogical students before they attend school teaching.

1. Introduction

Innovative education moves from the target approach to the competency approach, enhancing the learner's ability to perform tasks. This trend requires the renewal of the objectives, contents, methods, forms of teaching organization and evaluation of teaching results. Accurately evaluating the capacity of learners regularly, continuously will help teachers and learners see the shortcomings and their causes which are the basis for the teachers and learners to adjust the teaching - learning process to achieve higher efficiency. INTASC Teacher Rating Council of CCSSO has proposed eight criteria for evaluating teacher competencies, including some of the criteria related to the preparation of instructional plans such as: in subject matter; Knowledge of the student's cognitive ability to develop appropriate teaching methods; knowledge of the different learning styles of students to develop teaching methods for each student. Evaluation issues in higher education are of interest in many countries. Among the research-related studies in higher education published are the outstanding studies of some of the following authors Roth, Robert A; Mahoney, Peggy (1975) 1; Erwin, T. Dary (1991) 2; Boston, Carol (2002) 3, David D. Wiliam, Scott L Howell, Mary Hricko (2006) 4; Gronlund N. E (1985) 5; Hopkin K.D., Stanley J.C (1981) 6; Howard B.L. (1986) 7; Michael K. Rusell, Peter W. Airasian (2012) 8, Niko A.J., & Brookhart S.M (2007) 9; Ostelind S.J. (1992) 10; Ostelind S.J. (2002) 11; Rick Stiggins (2008) 12.

The authors such as Richard B. Fletcher, Luanna H. Meyer, Helen Anderson, Patricia Johnston, Malcolm Rees (2011) 13; Carol Evans (2013) 21 study the role and purpose of assessment in higher education, and evaluate results for a variety of purposes such as providing information about student learning, of the students, the quality of the teaching, the training program.

Research on the criteria for assessing teachers' teaching competencies is given by several authors such as Alnoor, A.G.; Yuanxiang, Guo; Abudhuim, F.S (2007) 14; Maryam Ilanlou, Maryam Zand (2011) 8. These studies show that the teaching capacity of teachers determines the quality of their teaching. For pedagogical students, teaching capacity is the capacity that needs to be assessed well before they take on high school. In order to have good teaching capacity, preparation for lesson planning is important but has been largely overlooked. Capacity to prepare lesson plans includes student exploration, course curriculum, learning material facilities - teaching aids and socio-economic conditions and the natural features of local. These criteria will help a lot in planning and organizing lessons in class.

A rubric is a set of criteria that can be expressed into measurable, and observable indicators, behaviors to indicate the level of achievement of the learning objective and to evaluate or inform about the product, performance of the learners. Criteria evaluation guides include one or more aspects, often referred to as criteria. Rating scales are called competence levels and definitions are also known as descriptive information 17. Rubric evaluations have the following advantages: (1) During the pre-assessment phase, the rubric is used to clarify the expectations of the instructor, indicating the grading method for the learner. As a result, learners can self-assess and grade their product before the instructor evaluates the product. (2) During the assessment period, the rubric helps the evaluator focus on pre-established criteria and objectively assess learner performance. (3) During the post-evaluation period, the learner is provided with scoring information, accompanied by a clear explanation of the result. Students will be aware of the strengths and shortcomings to overcome 16. Based on the criteria list and criteria description information to determine the number of levels used to evaluate criteria (3 levels, 4 levels or 5 levels). There are two types of levels commonly used in rubrics: Even numbers (two or four levels), if we need to distinguish between two extremes: pass and failure; In odd numbers (3 or 5 levels), if you need to determine an average level of competence. Studies on rubric evaluation have included some authors such as Moskal, B. M. (2000) 17; Nitko, A. J. (2001) 16; Harries Isacke (2011) 18; Pauline Dickinson, Jeffery Adams 19; Ángel Alsina and at al 20 ... All of these studies show the advantages of rubric for capacity assessment. In addition, what do these studies also describe the rubric? How to create it? How to use it?

The advantages of rubric are well suited for assessing general competencies and assessing the competency of planning capability of pedagogical students before they graduate and undertake post-graduate teaching.

2. The Rubric Construction Steps

Rubric is a set of criteria that can be visualized (measurable indicators, or observable behavioral behaviors) that reflect the level of achievement of learning objectives and are used to evaluate or inform the product or performance of a learner. Rubric reviews consist of one or more aspects, commonly known as criteria while rating scales are called level and capacity definition is also known as descriptive information. To build a rubric it is necessary to go through the following steps:

Step 1: Determine the criteria for the preparation of the lesson planning.

Each capacity is expressed by criteria, so the criteria must reflect the core content of the required capacity and must be described in accordance with the logic of pedagogy internship operations at the school, for the students to improve their skills to become future teachers. Therefore, all competency criteria are required to be evaluated. Describing competencies must be in accordance with the activity logic to guide students to follow.

Step 2: Define indicators of criteria

Criteria are described by indicators. Indicators are the collection of signs of a criterion or, in other words, indicators constitute actions that constitute an action in the structure of a teacher's teaching activity. To identify indicators, the information on the criteria should be used, the number of indicators may differ depending on the criteria.

Step 3: Describe the level of the indicator

Level 1: The lowest level (failing) corresponding to the level not assessed by the High School Teacher Career Standard

Level 2: Average (standard) corresponding to level 1 of the High School Teacher Career Standards

Level 3: The highest level (good), corresponding to level 2 (good) of the high school teachers

Levels 1, 2 and 3 have mutual relationships:

• Level 1 = information describing the lowest level

• Level 2 = Level 1 + ∆1

• Level 3 = Level 2 + ∆2

Whereas ∆1, ∆2 is the description of the indicators at a higher level of quality or quantity.

3. Describing the Competences

4. Conclusions

In order to develop the teaching plan, the first thing the teachers have to understand is the object, environment and teaching conditions, including: Students, subjects, technical facilities, teaching equipment in the school serving teaching and socio-economic factors, natural conditions of the locality to support the teaching practice. The information will be used for curriculum planning. The information about the subject and the teaching environment will be the basis for developing a test-assessment plan in each unit. Develop a rubric for capacity assessment of plan preparation will acquire information about learners to find out which criteria are limited to develop strategies of retraining. In addition, the results of the assessment of the preparation of teaching plans are the basis for adjusting the curriculum to suit the practical conditions.

Rubric evaluation is a choice for many professionals, especially for evaluating learner competencies. It's not only necessary managers to assess the competency of the teacher, but the information in the rubric also guides the teacher to what to do before taking the next steps of the teaching processing. Consequently, design rubric's evaluations are very popular, its not only for assessing teacher competence, but also for assessing the ability of students and learners in different contexts of the teaching processing.

References

[1]  Richard B. Fletcher, Luanna H. Meyer, Helen Anderson, Patricia Johnston, Malcolm Rees (2012). Faculty and Students Conceptions of Assessment in Higher Education, High Educ Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011.
In article      View Article
 
[2]  Erwin T.D. (1991). Assesing Student learning and Development, JMU, Virgina.
In article      
 
[3]  Boston, Carol (2002). Assessment and Evaluation, Maryland College Par.
In article      PubMed
 
[4]  David D. Wiliam, Scott L Howell, Mary Hricko. (2006). Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices, Information Sciene Publishing, Hershey. L. Melbourne, Singapore
In article      View Article
 
[5]  Gronlund N. E. (1985). Measurement and Evaluation in Teaching, New York, Mc Milan.
In article      
 
[6]  Hopkin K.D., Stanley J.C. (1981). Education and Psychological Measurement and Evaluation, Prentice hall, Inc.
In article      
 
[7]  Howard B.L. (1986). Evaluating and assesing for learning, New York.
In article      
 
[8]  Maryam Ilanlou, Maryam Zand (2011). “Professional Competencies of Teachers and the Qualitative Evaluation”, International Workshop on Education and Educational Psychology.
In article      View Article
 
[9]  Niko A.J., & Brookhart S.M. (2007). Education assessment of student (5th ed), Upper Saddle River, NJ: Peason/Prentice hall.
In article      
 
[10]  Ostelind S. J. (1992). Constructing test Items, Kluwer Academic Pulishers, London.
In article      
 
[11]  Ostelind S. J. (2002). Constructing test Items, Multi - choice, Constructed - Response, Performance and Other Formals, Kluwer Academic Pulishers, London.
In article      
 
[12]  Rick Stiggins. (2008). An Introduction to Student - Involved Assessment for learning, Upper Saddle, New Jersey Columbus, Ohio.
In article      
 
[13]  Richard B. Fletcher, Luanna H. Meyer, Helen Anderson, Patricia Johnston, Malcolm Rees. (2012). Faculty and Students Conceptions of Assessment in Higher Education, High Educ Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011.
In article      View Article
 
[14]  Alnoor, A.G.; Yuanxiang, Guo; Abudhuim, F.S. (2007). “Assessment Mathematics Teacher's Competencies”. ERIC Number: ED495712, Publication Type: Reports - Research.
In article      View Article
 
[15]  Maryam Ilanlou, Maryam Zand (2011), “Professional Competencies of Teachers and the Qualitative Evaluation”.
In article      View Article
 
[16]  Nitko, A. J. (2001). Educational assessment of students (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill."Rubistar Rubric Generator" (http://rubistar.4teachers.org/).
In article      View Article
 
[17]  Moskal, B. M. (2000). Scoring rubrics: what, when, and how?. Practical Assessment, Research, & Evaluation, 7(3). Available online:http://pareonline.net/getvn.asp?v=7&n=34.
In article      View Article
 
[18]  Harries Isacke. (2011). Backwards Planning: Building Enduring Understanding Through Instructional Design. Shell education publish, Inc.
In article      View Article
 
[19]  Pauline Dickinson, Jeffery Adams. (2017). Evaluation and Program Planning. Elsevier jounal, Volume 65, December 2017, Pages 113-116.
In article      
 
[20]  Ángel Alsina, Sara Ayllón, Jordi Colomer, Rosario Fernández-Peña, Judit Fullana, Maria Pallisera, Marc Pérez-Burriel, Laura Serra, Improving and evaluating reflective narratives: A rubric for higher education students. Elsevier jounal, Volume 63, April 2017, Pages 148-158.
In article      View Article
 
[21]  Carol Evans (2013), Making Sense of Assessment Feedback in Higher Education. Review of Educational Research, SAGE Journals March 2013, Vol. 83, No. 1, pp. 70-120.
In article      View Article
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2017 P.T. Huong and C.T.H. Linh

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Cite this article:

Normal Style
P.T. Huong, C.T.H. Linh. Building Rubrics for Evaluating the Competence of Preparing for Lesson Plans of Pedagogical Student. World Journal of Chemical Education. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp 175-179. http://pubs.sciepub.com/wjce/5/5/6
MLA Style
Huong, P.T., and C.T.H. Linh. "Building Rubrics for Evaluating the Competence of Preparing for Lesson Plans of Pedagogical Student." World Journal of Chemical Education 5.5 (2017): 175-179.
APA Style
Huong, P. , & Linh, C. (2017). Building Rubrics for Evaluating the Competence of Preparing for Lesson Plans of Pedagogical Student. World Journal of Chemical Education, 5(5), 175-179.
Chicago Style
Huong, P.T., and C.T.H. Linh. "Building Rubrics for Evaluating the Competence of Preparing for Lesson Plans of Pedagogical Student." World Journal of Chemical Education 5, no. 5 (2017): 175-179.
Share
[1]  Richard B. Fletcher, Luanna H. Meyer, Helen Anderson, Patricia Johnston, Malcolm Rees (2012). Faculty and Students Conceptions of Assessment in Higher Education, High Educ Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011.
In article      View Article
 
[2]  Erwin T.D. (1991). Assesing Student learning and Development, JMU, Virgina.
In article      
 
[3]  Boston, Carol (2002). Assessment and Evaluation, Maryland College Par.
In article      PubMed
 
[4]  David D. Wiliam, Scott L Howell, Mary Hricko. (2006). Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices, Information Sciene Publishing, Hershey. L. Melbourne, Singapore
In article      View Article
 
[5]  Gronlund N. E. (1985). Measurement and Evaluation in Teaching, New York, Mc Milan.
In article      
 
[6]  Hopkin K.D., Stanley J.C. (1981). Education and Psychological Measurement and Evaluation, Prentice hall, Inc.
In article      
 
[7]  Howard B.L. (1986). Evaluating and assesing for learning, New York.
In article      
 
[8]  Maryam Ilanlou, Maryam Zand (2011). “Professional Competencies of Teachers and the Qualitative Evaluation”, International Workshop on Education and Educational Psychology.
In article      View Article
 
[9]  Niko A.J., & Brookhart S.M. (2007). Education assessment of student (5th ed), Upper Saddle River, NJ: Peason/Prentice hall.
In article      
 
[10]  Ostelind S. J. (1992). Constructing test Items, Kluwer Academic Pulishers, London.
In article      
 
[11]  Ostelind S. J. (2002). Constructing test Items, Multi - choice, Constructed - Response, Performance and Other Formals, Kluwer Academic Pulishers, London.
In article      
 
[12]  Rick Stiggins. (2008). An Introduction to Student - Involved Assessment for learning, Upper Saddle, New Jersey Columbus, Ohio.
In article      
 
[13]  Richard B. Fletcher, Luanna H. Meyer, Helen Anderson, Patricia Johnston, Malcolm Rees. (2012). Faculty and Students Conceptions of Assessment in Higher Education, High Educ Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011.
In article      View Article
 
[14]  Alnoor, A.G.; Yuanxiang, Guo; Abudhuim, F.S. (2007). “Assessment Mathematics Teacher's Competencies”. ERIC Number: ED495712, Publication Type: Reports - Research.
In article      View Article
 
[15]  Maryam Ilanlou, Maryam Zand (2011), “Professional Competencies of Teachers and the Qualitative Evaluation”.
In article      View Article
 
[16]  Nitko, A. J. (2001). Educational assessment of students (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill."Rubistar Rubric Generator" (http://rubistar.4teachers.org/).
In article      View Article
 
[17]  Moskal, B. M. (2000). Scoring rubrics: what, when, and how?. Practical Assessment, Research, & Evaluation, 7(3). Available online:http://pareonline.net/getvn.asp?v=7&n=34.
In article      View Article
 
[18]  Harries Isacke. (2011). Backwards Planning: Building Enduring Understanding Through Instructional Design. Shell education publish, Inc.
In article      View Article
 
[19]  Pauline Dickinson, Jeffery Adams. (2017). Evaluation and Program Planning. Elsevier jounal, Volume 65, December 2017, Pages 113-116.
In article      
 
[20]  Ángel Alsina, Sara Ayllón, Jordi Colomer, Rosario Fernández-Peña, Judit Fullana, Maria Pallisera, Marc Pérez-Burriel, Laura Serra, Improving and evaluating reflective narratives: A rubric for higher education students. Elsevier jounal, Volume 63, April 2017, Pages 148-158.
In article      View Article
 
[21]  Carol Evans (2013), Making Sense of Assessment Feedback in Higher Education. Review of Educational Research, SAGE Journals March 2013, Vol. 83, No. 1, pp. 70-120.
In article      View Article