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Research Article
Open Access Peer-reviewed

Assessing the Human Resource Team’s Performance

Neeraj Kumari
Journal of Business and Management Sciences. 2017, 5(3), 85-92. DOI: 10.12691/jbms-5-3-3
Published online: September 27, 2017

Abstract

The study aims to assess the present performance of the HR Team. The performance of the individual employees has been assessed through trend lines, with the help of various bar graphs. These charts were meant to provide the trend of individual employees, and configure areas of attention and improvement. The data used to examine the performance of the employees includes both primary and secondary data. For Primary data, a questionnaire was administered personally to all the Human Resource staff. For Secondary data various articles, books and websites were consulted the names of which are duly mentioned in the literature review and reference section. The sample size is 10. This includes 5 Executives, 2 Senior Executives and 3 Assistant Managers. For designing the Questionnaire Likert Scale was used. The questions are based on certain parameters such as innovation, vision, trust etc, which are essential elements of a High Performance team. To conclude, there should be more team bonding. There should be more transparency. More non- monetary rewards and recognitions should be introduced for motivational purposes. More training and developmental programs should be encouraged. There should be reduction in transactional work. Job rotation should be practiced more frequently. All this will lead to a high performance team. The management should work towards creating an environment where creativity is encouraged, increased people participation in the decision making process, development of trust among employees and provide more cross functional exposure.

 

JEL codes: O3, O2, O3, M0, M0

1. Introduction

The idea of, High Performance Team (HPT) was acquainted as one purposefully outlined with draw out the best in individuals and in this way create hierarchical capacity that conveys practical authoritative outcomes. Rather than regarding individuals as dispensable parts of always moving impermanent organizations together, HPTs put individuals first. They are viewed as the significant asset in giving the ability to convey maintainable high performance. At the center of a high-performing association is a solid hierarchical culture.

Superior culture in an association reflects:

1. Lucidity about targets and objectives, i.e., a common vision

2. Ceaseless evaluation of execution input

3. Perceiving their execution.

4. Correspondence, joint effort and attachment.

The 7 Components of high performance:

1. Put Individuals at the Focal point of all that you do; representatives, clients, and group

2. Manufacture Trust as an establishment

3. Permit Moral Duty through individual basic leadership

4. Offer a Dream of an Adjusted Reason, Qualities, and Objectives

5. Make Passionate Associations through Administration

6. Concentrate on Qualities and Complement the Positive

7. Empower Development, since adequate is insufficient

For an elite group, individuals ought to be at the focal point of everything, arrangements, plans and so forth they ought to be a critical piece of the basic leadership process. Worker's perspectives and assessments ought to be properly considered. Trust ought to be the base of relations among representatives and between the pioneer and the individuals. An enthusiastic association helps in making a comprehension. To work in trust and advance individuals investment, representatives should enough self-governance and they ought to be responsible for their work. The qualities of the colleagues ought to be complemented or underlined to improve comes about. Above all there ought to be an arrangement amongst individual and hierarchical objectives. In conclusion, development ought to dependably be supported, as adequate is insufficient. Since, it is just through advancement that present day organizations can survive.

1) People Cooperation: None of the other 6 Components can exist without the Attention on Individuals. Individuals are the center of any association. It takes individuals, the individual individuals to make the collaboration. An elite group is one, where there is satisfactory investment of individuals in the basic leadership process. Include individuals into everything.

2) Trust: Trust, is the establishment from which everything else can exist. Without Trust, you can't assemble Moral Duty nor would they be able to be propelled by the Vision or Authority. Trust is a basic component for any expectation of accomplishing superior. Individuals from superior group believe each other. What's more, they additionally show confide in their pioneers. Relational trust among colleagues encourages collaboration, diminishes the need to screen every others conduct, and bonds individuals around the conviction that others in the group won't exploit them. Colleagues will probably go out on a limb and uncover vulnerabilities when they trust they can confide in others on their group. Trust in initiative is imperative in that it enables the group to acknowledge and focus on their pioneer's objective and vision.

3) Personal Duty: Mindful colleagues know they are responsible for delivering comes about; they accept responsibility for position, and do it to the best of their capacity. They consistently search for courses in which they can enhance their execution. Fruitful groups make individuals separately and mutually responsible for the group's objectives, reason and approach. Individuals comprehend what they are independently and mutually in charge of.

4) Vision – a typical reason: Elite groups have a typical and important reason that gives guidance, force, and duty for individuals. This design is a dream. It's more extensive than particular objectives. Individuals from elite groups put a colossal measure of time and exertion into talking about, forming, and conceding to a reason that has a place with them both all in all and exclusively. This basic reason, when acknowledged by the group, turns into what might as well be called what heavenly route is to a ship skipper it gives guidance and direction under any conditions. The majority of the representatives in the association know about the organization vision and center estimations of the organization. A feeling of arrangement empowers people to distinguish their own individual objectives inside the bigger system of authoritative objectives. Nothing is more propelling to a group than the quality of a common vision and lucidity of reason.

5) Strength: To get the best out of people it is vital to concentrate on quality and underline on the constructive, as opposed to stick point at their shortcomings. Emphasizing qualities supports people self-assurance, confidence and resolve, empowering them to perform better in future. This is one of the fundamental components required to make a superior group. In an elite group, Administrators comprehend the individual qualities that every individual can convey to a group, select individuals because of their qualities, and dispense work assignments that fit with individuals' favored styles. By coordinating person's inclinations with group part requests, directors improve the probability that the colleagues will function admirably together.

6) Creativity and Advancement: An elite group is one that supports development and imagination. By utilizing new and imaginative thoughts, a group can play out the current errands better.

7) Rewards and Acknowledgments: The reward framework ought to support agreeable endeavors as opposed to focused ones. Advancements, increases in salary, and different types of acknowledgment ought to be given to people for how powerful they are as a communitarian colleague. This doesn't mean individual commitments are disregarded; rather, they are adjusted with sacrificial commitments to the group. Groups give kinship. It's energizing and fulfilling to be an indispensable piece of an effective group. The chance to participate in self-improvement and to enable partners to develop can be extremely fulfilling and remunerating background for workers.

2. Literature Review

Execution and strength are critical properties that should be guaranteed. Despite the fact that methodologies for execution and versatility have been produced (e.g., for oddity recognition and adaptation to non-critical failure), there are no benchmarking situations for their assessment under controlled conditions 1. The study demonstrated that the past high-performance work systems (HPWS) emphatically add to profitability and in addition the invert. The equal relationship bolsters the need to broaden vital human asset administration hypothesis by considering profitability as a precursor and also a result of human asset administration hones 2. The outcomes demonstrate that group adequacy intervenes the connection between capacity upgrading practices and group inventiveness, and learning sharing intercedes the connection between inspiration improving practices and group imagination 3. The examination explores the linkage components through which high-performance work systems (HPWS) impact the performance of professional service firms (PSFs). The primary instrument is the scholarly capital assets including the human, social, and hierarchical capital that HPWS make. The second instrument is the utilizations to which both HPWS and assets can be connected, operationalized as authoritative ability to use both hands, the concurrent abuse of existing information and investigation of new learning. These systems are estimated to interface HPWS to firm performance as practices-assets utilizes performance linkage show 4. Discoveries uncovered that groups that wavered amongst decisive and helpful learning trade forms were more successful. We additionally discovered such double procedures were more pervasive in associations that had an engagement-centered assorted variety atmosphere portrayed by usage of decent variety to educate and improve work forms in view of the supposition that social contrasts offer ascent to various information, experiences, and option sees 5. Constrained hypothesis and research has been dedicated to the part of group identity piece, and also emanant and shared administration, in virtual groups. The examination infers that the connections between group identity creation and virtual group execution are backhanded, through rising authority and shared initiative 6. The results depicted that HPWS influenced employee attitude (turnover intention (TOI), organizational commitment (OC) & job satisfaction (JS)) through HR flexibility (behavior flexibility Functional flexibility and Skill malleability). HPWS is positively related to individual’s job level attitudinal factors i.e. turnover intention (TOI), organizational commitment (OC) & job satisfaction (JS). The 24% proportion of variance of OC, 63% of job satisfaction and 18% TOI is explained by the independent variables. HPWS explained 29% portion of employee’s attitude 7. The presence of an upset U-formed connection amongst investigation and misuse (turnover procedures) and gathering proficiency under specific conditions, for example, the quantity of work frameworks considered and the period amid which the level of turnover is figured 8. The elite HR rehearses were specifically identified with work engagement and in addition in a roundabout way related through representatives' apparent authoritative help. Thus, work engagement was decidedly identified with in-part execution and adversely identified with aim to stop. Culture was found to go about as a basic relevant factor, as the outcomes additionally uncovered that the connection between HR hones and saw hierarchical help was more grounded when cooperation was high and when control remove introduction was low 9. The study assesses if there is a hole between what colleagues and pioneers see as being (a) the most essential components for overseeing groups into elite and (b) the elements that are available in their groups. The examination demonstrates that, in spite of the fact that groups under scrutiny had some high-performing highlights at the initiative measurement, there is opportunity to get better, specifically with regards to enabling colleagues, including them in arranging the work, and making legitimate reward frameworks 10. Human asset administration practices may fortify innovativeness through mental strengthening; the investigation recognizes yet another way through which human asset practices may incite inventiveness. Experienced elite work frameworks will provoke laborers to trade work related data with associates. The subsequent upgraded level of data trade, thusly, may enhance laborers' inventiveness execution 11. Neither self-coordinating groups nor Groups of Training have or depend exclusively on outside supervision or course. Accordingly, the nature and wellspring of authority is inside. There is some proof that forced, outside initiative might be counterproductive to the advancing adequacy of self-coordinated groups and Groups of Training, or that an illuminated type of collegial, facilitative authority is required 12.

3. Research Methodology

Objective: To assess the present performance of the HR Team.

Data collection: The data used to examine the performance of the employees includes both primary and secondary data. For Primary data, a questionnaire was administered personally to all the Human Resource staff. For Secondary data various articles, books and websites were consulted the names of which are duly mentioned in the literature review and reference section.

Area of study & sample size: The target Population for conducting the Project was, the HR Staff of a BPO in NCR, Delhi. The HR staff consisted of 10 employees each handling different areas of HR. Thus the sample size used to conduct the study was 10. This includes 5 Executives, 2 Senior Executives and 3 Assistant Managers.

Selection of tool: For designing the Questionnaire Likert Scale was used. The questions are based on certain parameters such as innovation, vision, trust etc, which are essential elements of a High Performance team. The responses of the employees were analyzed using various Statistical tools in Excel, such as Bar charts, mean, standard deviation.

4. Data Analysis & Interpretations

Trend Line and Benchmarking for Individual Employees

The following, graphs depict individual performance through trend lines. The purpose of these trend lines is to enable the senior management to gauge the performance of each employee, as to which direction he or she is moving and what are his/her grey areas.

A benchmarking has been done, which is depicted through the yellow lines. Three has been chosen as the benchmark, as for a high performance team, the standards should be high. Those areas in which the responses of the employee have been below 3 are marked darkened to enable easy identification of grey areas that need to be paid attention.

In case of the first employee, E1 feels that enough of creative opportunities are not provided, similarly he or she less participation in the decision making process. And concern is that E1 feels enough of job- rotation is not happening within the organization.

These areas, as they fall below the benchmark have been darkened for easy identification.

Interpretations: Major observation has been that most of the employee’s i.e., 5 out of 10 feel that cross- functionalization is not happening within the team. These figure prompted the senior management to initiate measures to cross – functionalize the team. Similarly, three out of ten employees feel that, they don’t get enough opportunities to use their creativity. Four out of ten employees feel that, they are not involved in the decision making process and also that commitments made at workplace often not kept by their colleagues, hampering the trust factor.

Surprisingly, all the employees feel that their individual goals are aligned to the organizational goals. Goal alignment is an important factor for a high performing team.

Interpretations - The overall Mean is 2.94. i.e. 3. This means often the current Human Resource team of the organization, exhibits the traits of a High Performance Team. The overall Standard Deviation is 0.378706656, i.e. 0.37. This means all the data points are close to the mean.

The chart below depicts the overall performance of the Human Resource team, by combining all the elements of high performance.

The yellow dashed line depicts the benchmark, i.e. minimum requirement to be a high performing team.

So, the management should work towards creating an environment where creativity is encouraged, increased people participation in the decision making process, development of trust among employees and provide more cross functional exposure.

5. Conclusions

There ought to be more group holding. There ought to be more straightforwardness. More non-financial prizes and acknowledgments ought to be presented for motivational purposes. Additional preparation and formative projects ought to be energized. There ought to be lessening in value-based work. Occupation pivot ought to be drilled all the more much of the time. Every one of the representatives feels that their individual objectives are adjusted to the hierarchical objectives. This will prompt an elite group. The administration should work towards making a domain where imagination is supported, expanded individuals’ investment in the basic leadership process, improvement of trust among representatives and give more cross utilitarian introduction.

References

[1]  Düllmann, T. F., & Van Hoorn, A. (2017 April). Model-driven Generation of Microservice Architectures for Benchmarking Performance and Resilience Engineering Approaches. In Proceedings of the 8th ACM/SPEC on International Conference on Performance Engineering Companion (pp. 171-172). ACM.
In article      View Article
 
[2]  Shin, D., & Konrad, A. M. (2017). Causality between high-performance work systems and organizational performance. Journal of Management, 43(4), 973-997.
In article      View Article
 
[3]  Ma, Z., Long, L., Zhang, Y., Zhang, J., & Lam, C. K. (2017). Why do high-performance human resource practices matter for team creativity? The mediating role of collective efficacy and knowledge sharing. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 1-22.
In article      View Article
 
[4]  Fu, N., Flood, P. C., Bosak, J., Rousseau, D. M., Morris, T., & O'Regan, P. (2017). High‐Performance work systems in professional service firms: Examining the practices‐resources‐uses‐performance linkage. Human Resource Management, 56(2), 329-352.
In article      View Article
 
[5]  Hajro, A., Gibson, C. B., & Pudelko, M. (2017). Knowledge exchange processes in multicultural teams: Linking organizational diversity climates to teams’ effectiveness. Academy of Management Journal, 60(1), 345-372.
In article      View Article
 
[6]  Hoch, J. E., & Dulebohn, J. H. (2017). Team personality composition, emergent leadership and shared leadership in virtual teams: A theoretical framework. Human Resource Management Review.
In article      View Article
 
[7]  Mahmood, A., Khurshid, M. K., & Ali, U. (2017). The Impact of High Performance Work System on Employees Attitude: The Mediating Role of Human Resource Flexibility. Journal of Contemporary Management Sciences, 2(1), 83-124.
In article      
 
[8]  Fernandez, V., Fernandez, V., Simo, P., Simo, P., Sallan, J. M., & Sallan, J. M. (2016). Turnover and balance between exploration and exploitation processes for high-performance teams. Team Performance Management, 22(3/4), 204-222.
In article      View Article
 
[9]  Zhong, L., Wayne, S. J., & Liden, R. C. (2016). Job engagement, perceived organizational support, high‐performance human resource practices, and cultural value orientations: A cross‐level investigation. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 37(6), 823-844.
In article      View Article
 
[10]  Dominguez, C., Moura, I. C., & Varajão, J. (2016). High Performance Teams: Do Perceptions and Reality Match?. International Journal of Information Technology Project Management (IJITPM), 7(2), 72-82.
In article      View Article
 
[11]  Chiang, Y. H., Hsu, C. C., & Shih, H. A. (2015). Experienced high performance work system, extroversion personality, and creativity performance. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 32(2), 531-549.
In article      View Article
 
[12]  Hays, J. M. (2014). High-performance teams and communities of practice. Oxford Journal: An International Journal of Business & Economics, 5(1).
In article      View Article
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2017 Neeraj Kumari

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Cite this article:

Normal Style
Neeraj Kumari. Assessing the Human Resource Team’s Performance. Journal of Business and Management Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2017, pp 85-92. http://pubs.sciepub.com/jbms/5/3/3
MLA Style
Kumari, Neeraj. "Assessing the Human Resource Team’s Performance." Journal of Business and Management Sciences 5.3 (2017): 85-92.
APA Style
Kumari, N. (2017). Assessing the Human Resource Team’s Performance. Journal of Business and Management Sciences, 5(3), 85-92.
Chicago Style
Kumari, Neeraj. "Assessing the Human Resource Team’s Performance." Journal of Business and Management Sciences 5, no. 3 (2017): 85-92.
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[1]  Düllmann, T. F., & Van Hoorn, A. (2017 April). Model-driven Generation of Microservice Architectures for Benchmarking Performance and Resilience Engineering Approaches. In Proceedings of the 8th ACM/SPEC on International Conference on Performance Engineering Companion (pp. 171-172). ACM.
In article      View Article
 
[2]  Shin, D., & Konrad, A. M. (2017). Causality between high-performance work systems and organizational performance. Journal of Management, 43(4), 973-997.
In article      View Article
 
[3]  Ma, Z., Long, L., Zhang, Y., Zhang, J., & Lam, C. K. (2017). Why do high-performance human resource practices matter for team creativity? The mediating role of collective efficacy and knowledge sharing. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 1-22.
In article      View Article
 
[4]  Fu, N., Flood, P. C., Bosak, J., Rousseau, D. M., Morris, T., & O'Regan, P. (2017). High‐Performance work systems in professional service firms: Examining the practices‐resources‐uses‐performance linkage. Human Resource Management, 56(2), 329-352.
In article      View Article
 
[5]  Hajro, A., Gibson, C. B., & Pudelko, M. (2017). Knowledge exchange processes in multicultural teams: Linking organizational diversity climates to teams’ effectiveness. Academy of Management Journal, 60(1), 345-372.
In article      View Article
 
[6]  Hoch, J. E., & Dulebohn, J. H. (2017). Team personality composition, emergent leadership and shared leadership in virtual teams: A theoretical framework. Human Resource Management Review.
In article      View Article
 
[7]  Mahmood, A., Khurshid, M. K., & Ali, U. (2017). The Impact of High Performance Work System on Employees Attitude: The Mediating Role of Human Resource Flexibility. Journal of Contemporary Management Sciences, 2(1), 83-124.
In article      
 
[8]  Fernandez, V., Fernandez, V., Simo, P., Simo, P., Sallan, J. M., & Sallan, J. M. (2016). Turnover and balance between exploration and exploitation processes for high-performance teams. Team Performance Management, 22(3/4), 204-222.
In article      View Article
 
[9]  Zhong, L., Wayne, S. J., & Liden, R. C. (2016). Job engagement, perceived organizational support, high‐performance human resource practices, and cultural value orientations: A cross‐level investigation. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 37(6), 823-844.
In article      View Article
 
[10]  Dominguez, C., Moura, I. C., & Varajão, J. (2016). High Performance Teams: Do Perceptions and Reality Match?. International Journal of Information Technology Project Management (IJITPM), 7(2), 72-82.
In article      View Article
 
[11]  Chiang, Y. H., Hsu, C. C., & Shih, H. A. (2015). Experienced high performance work system, extroversion personality, and creativity performance. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 32(2), 531-549.
In article      View Article
 
[12]  Hays, J. M. (2014). High-performance teams and communities of practice. Oxford Journal: An International Journal of Business & Economics, 5(1).
In article      View Article