Analysis of Effectiveness of Executive Trainees’ Training Programme with a Special Reference to Non-...

Neeraj Kumari

Journal of Business and Management Sciences OPEN ACCESSPEER-REVIEWED

Analysis of Effectiveness of Executive Trainees’ Training Programme with a Special Reference to Non-academic Parameters

Neeraj Kumari

Department of Humanities & Management, Faculty of Engineering & Technology, Manav Rachna International University Faridabad, Haryana, India

Abstract

The aim of the study is to analyze the efficiency of Training programme with a special reference to non-academic parameters and to find out if there is any improvement required to make the training programme more effective. The study has used descriptive research design. The sample size was 127. A survey was carried out to obtain feedback of the trainees and assess the training delivery on non-academic aspect. The findings show that the trainees were satisfied to a large extent with the training programme. To conclude, trainees should be asked to provide continuous feedback regarding the study material, faculty, food, facilities and infrastructure like library and computer labs.

Cite this article:

  • Neeraj Kumari. Analysis of Effectiveness of Executive Trainees’ Training Programme with a Special Reference to Non-academic Parameters. Journal of Business and Management Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2015, pp 92-95. http://pubs.sciepub.com/jbms/3/3/2
  • Kumari, Neeraj. "Analysis of Effectiveness of Executive Trainees’ Training Programme with a Special Reference to Non-academic Parameters." Journal of Business and Management Sciences 3.3 (2015): 92-95.
  • Kumari, N. (2015). Analysis of Effectiveness of Executive Trainees’ Training Programme with a Special Reference to Non-academic Parameters. Journal of Business and Management Sciences, 3(3), 92-95.
  • Kumari, Neeraj. "Analysis of Effectiveness of Executive Trainees’ Training Programme with a Special Reference to Non-academic Parameters." Journal of Business and Management Sciences 3, no. 3 (2015): 92-95.

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1. Introduction

The study is based on the Training & Development Programme of ET’S (Executive Trainees). The study is conducted on the overall development of ET’S after the final placement in POWER GRID. Executive Trainees are recruited / selected in POWERGRID through a rigorous process of written test followed by Group Discussion, Interview and medical fitness tests.

On selection, the newly recruited Executive Trainees are put to one year comprehensive training programme. The prescribed one year training programme has been designed to guide the young executives in transforming their academic knowledge into practical applications to suit to POWERGRID needs. The training programme has a balanced usage of technical, management and soft skills inputs to give them the foundation, industrial visits to acquaint them of the latest practices in the industry and on the job training to give a practical exposure to all facets of POWERGRID working, where they get chance to groom themselves to become the top Power Professional.

After selection, the recruited Executive Trainees are put to one year Training Programme:

Table A: Break-up of one year Training Procedure

In this way they also get an opportunity to meet representatives of various department and regions. Induction process is not a one-off process they will be able to benefit from this development opportunity throughout your career either through formal structured programmes or events or from informal activities.

After second phase of overall Training, they have to submit their report at the time of FINAL-APPRAISAL & according to the overall performance of the Trainees the held Committee rates them & on the basis of merit their posting are being decided. POWERGRID provides a learning teaching and research environment that is second to none and there is only one way of achieving it which is through the quality and commitment of the POWERGRID.

2. Review of Literature

Fullerton [4] An awareness of time contexts and complex change is essential, so too is an appreciation of primary sources. Reading the present into the past (anachronism) is to be avoided, and the interpretation and explanation of events are essential to good history.

Kraiger et al. [2] discovered that among organizations participating in the American Society for Training and Development Benchmarking Services, 75 per cent measured training reaction, 41 per cent measured learning, but only 21 per cent measured behavior and only 11 per cent organizational results.

Yadapadithaya [7] studied the current practices of evaluating training and development programmes in the Indian corporate sector on the basis of data collected from written questionnaires mailed to 252 respondent companies – 127 private, 99 public, and 26 multinational corporations (MNCs). The major findings of his study include the following:

•  High pressure for increased quality, innovation, and productivity acts as a major driving force for the Indian corporate training and development programmes.

•  Most of the key result areas of training and development function are related to the measurement and evaluation of training effectiveness.

•  Absence of transfer of learning from the place of training to the workplace has been a major perceived deficiency of the corporate training and development system.

•  Indian corporate sector is currently facing the challenge of designing and developing more valid, reliable and operational measures to evaluate the effectiveness of training and development.

Dana [3] Entrepreneurship creates wealth and reduces unemployment. Entrepreneurs contribute to industrialization as well as to economic growth; they improve living standards and tax revenues from their enterprises contribute to a nation’s treasury. Not surprisingly, then, governments have been spending considerable sums trying to create entrepreneurs.

Srivastava. et al. [5] evaluated the effectiveness of various training programmes offered by the in-house training centre of Tata Steel, Shavak Nanavati Training Institute (SNTI), India. Effectiveness of training was measured in terms of various outcomes such as satisfaction level; reaction and feedback of participants; and change in performance and behavior as perceived by participants, their immediate supervisors, and departmental heads. The sample consisted of sixty departmental heads, fourteen hundred participants and thirteen hundred immediate supervisors from various departments. The data were collected through structured interview schedule. It was found that the satisfaction levels of participants, their superiors, and divisional heads were above average for all types of programmes. The participants were benefited from the programmes, but transfer of learning was not as expected from their supervisors. There were changes in the post-training performance ranging from 10 to 37 per cent. Training programmes could meet the objectives only to a limited extent.

Blanchard et al. [1] studied training evaluation practices at both management and non-management level in Canada through a survey of 202 organisations, employing a total of over 4,70,000 employees, thus representing a significant portion of the Canadian workforce. The survey data indicated that only one-fifth of the Canadian organisations evaluated their training as suggested by academic standards. The researchers presented practitioner perspective as a supporting rationale for the survey results.

Wexley and Baldwin [6] criticised the traditional training and development for its lack of accountability. According to him the lack of accountability and rigorous evaluation may be attributable in part to an unfounded belief that “training and development is good for the employees and the organisation; so let there be training budget and training programmes”. This target-based (e.g., a specific number of employees to be trained during a given year) or budget-driven (influenced by the availability of time, energy, and resources) training and development efforts will ultimately lead to the result that “training is only a paid perquisite or free time for the employees devoid of daily stressors and distractions of the workplace on the one hand, and a wasteful expenditure for the management on the other”.

3. Research Methodology

3.1. Objectives

•  To analyze the efficiency of Training programme with a special reference to non-academic parameters.

•  To find out if there is any improvement required to make the training programme more effective.

Type of research: Descriptive research design

Sample Size: ET’S who have undergone the Training process of one year in NPTI, Faridabad. The total no of ET’s were 127.

Company: Power grid Corporation of India Limited

Methods of Data collection: The primary data has been collected through Questionnaire. While the secondary data for the study has been taken from various sources like: Company Website (www.powergridindia.com), books, magazines & Journals, Company’s Manual.

Feedback report from Executive Trainees: In order to get feedback from Executive trainees on non-academic aspects of their training module, a questionnaire was distributed to them for obtaining their feedback based on 8 statements on non academic aspects. These statements were on Likert point scale wherein trainees were asked to provide their feedback by ticking any one of the categories ranging from Strongly Disagree to Strongly Agree (five categories). Apart from rating the statements, suggestions were also invited on addition/ deletion of topic(s) and preferred duration of class-room training and On Job Training (OJT).

4. Data Analysis and Findings

The feedback reports were received from 127 Executive Trainees who have undergone classroom training at NPTI, Faridabad. The summary of Mean Rating for Various Aspects of training module is given below:

Feedback on non-academic aspects of training

Table 1. Showing MEAN RATINGS of feedback on non-academic aspects of training

NON- ACADEMIC PARAMETERS

Table 2. Showing responses for, The lodging arrangement during period was good

Table 3. Showing responses for, The food provided was hygienically served, well cooked and fresh

Table 4. Showing responses for, The library facility was sufficient for the purpose of training

Table 5. Showing responses for, The facilities for outdoor extracurricular activities were good

Table 6. Showing responses for, The facilities for indoor extra curricular activities were good

Table 7. Showing responses for, The computer facilities were adequate and well maintained

Table 8. Showing responses for, The administration and co ordination by the institute was good

Table 9. Showing responses for, Recommend the Institute for the next batch

5. Findings

Major findings and issues necessitating action for enhancing training effectiveness are:

•  The Lodging & Boarding arrangement, facilities for indoor as well as outdoor curricular activities have been found to be in order in the above cited Institute.

•  In general the Computer & Library Facilities were not advanced and need to be improved.

•  Merely 61.42% ETs are of the view that the food was hygienic and was not of good quality. It is proposed to request NPTI for improving Computer, Library & food facilities before the induction of next batch.

•  97.64% ETs are of the view that the administration and the co- ordination by the institute were good, while 92.13% of ETs are of the view that they will recommend the institute for next batch.

6. Suggestions for Addition/ Deletion of Topics/ Subjects

Feedback on topics/ subjects to be added:

•  Trouble Shooting of problems face in switchyard equipments and in relay Panel room’s equipments should be taught before OJT.

•  Some Demo of using equipments on class room training should be given.

•  Site related issues should be taken in to consideration.

7. Conclusions

With the need to equip the trainees with organization culture/ dynamics, functional, project management, to perform effectively on absorption the training plan is being worked out for the ensuring ETs batch. Trainees should be asked to provide continuous feedback regarding the study material, faculty, food, facilities and infrastructure like library and computer labs.

References

[1]  Blanchard, P.N., Thacker, J.W., & Way, S.A. (2000). Training evaluation: Perspectives and evidence from Canada. Indian Journal of Industrial Relations, 33(3), 295-304.
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[2]  Kurt Kraiger, J. Kevin Ford, Eduardo Salas, (1993) ‘ Applicatin of cognitive, skill-based, and affective theories of learning outcomes to New methods of training evaluation’ Journal of Applied Psychology, vol.78, No.2, pp 311-328.
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[3]  Leo Paul Dana, (2001) "The education and training of entrepreneurs in Asia", Education + Training, Vol. 43 Iss: 8/9, pp. 405-416
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[4]  Ronald A. Fullerton, (2011) "Historical methodology: the perspective of a professionally trained historian turned marketer", Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, Vol. 3 Iss: 4, pp.436-448
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[5]  Srivastava, K.B.L., Deb, S., & Prasad, A.P. (2001). Evaluating training effectiveness and customer satisfaction in Tata Steel- A case study. Indian Journal of Training and Development, 1(1), 45-56.
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[6]  Wexley, K.N., and Baldwin, T.T. (1986), ‘Management development,’ Journal of Management, 12, 277-294.
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[7]  Yadapadithaya, P.S. (2001). Evaluating corporate training and development: An Indian experience. International Journal of Training and Development, 5(4), 261-274.
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