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Research Article
Open Access Peer-reviewed

Extension to the Cause of the Allais Effect Solved

Bjarne Lorenzen
Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology. 2017, 3(2), 26-27. DOI: 10.12691/faac-3-2-3
Published online: November 10, 2017

Abstract

Predicted Gravity Measurement near the Arctic confirms the claims and prediction that the Earth is accelerating.

1. Introduction

During the summer 2017, an article 1 as well as an Erratum 2 was published in the International Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics 2, claiming that the Allais Effect was Solved and that the cause of this mystery was due to Dark Flow Acceleration (hereafter DFA).

Furthermore, in the Erratum 2, it was predicted that if a relative and absolute gravimeter would simultaneously measure acceleration due to gravity (hereafter ADG) at the same position near the Arctic and by certain lunar or solar eclipses, that would reveal a significant measurement disagreement between two different kinds of gravimeters.

The claims were:

• The relative gravimeter would measure only ADG of the Earth.

• The absolute gravimeter would measure ADG of the Earth and DFA

• The anomaly was predicted to increase until maximum eclipse and then decrease again.

The lunar eclipse on 7 August 18.20 UTC was predicted to be the best possible event to test the above-mentioned claim in 2017 and several years to come.

Several universities (on the northern hemisphere) was encouraged to measure ADG on 7 August as recommended in the two above-mentioned articles.

Unfortunately, only DTU (Denmark) promised to see what they could do as they had a gravity measurement project going on in Greenland anyway (measuring how fast the inland ice is melting).

At the time of contacting DTU, the measurement teams had already scheduled the 2017 summer measurement missions to Greenland as well as the time to arrive at and leave various measurement places.

Early in the morning on 7 August (the day of the Lunar Eclipse), the team had scheduled to fly (by helicopter) from an inland measurement station and to Scoresbysund airport and then to continue measuring ADG near that airport - 12 hours before and after the lunar eclipse - starting in the morning of 7 August and until morning on the following day, 8 August.

However, bad weather delayed the flight to the airport, and the gravity measurement (the day of the eclipse) was not started until 21.50 UTC. This was 3.5 hours after the culmination of the lunar eclipse.

Figure 1 shows that from the start of the measurement (at 21.50 UTC) and all night during which the measurement went on, the absolute (blue) curve was gradually decreasing (“depressed”) relative to the (red) relative measurement curve. This result was exactly as the theory had predicted earlier that summer.

The data used for Figure 1 is completely unfiltered for tidal and other influences.

The temperature variation (during that day and night) was recorded to 8 °C. - 3

The night temperature variation therefore must have been much less than 8 °C.

Such insignificant temperature variation is far from enough to explain the cause of such a significant anomaly that was measured that day.

There is no doubt that the two gravimeters reveal a remarkable mysterious anomaly between 40 and 50 µGal.

The cause of this anomaly is, of course, unknown. To speculate, one can suspect a few different causes, for example that something was wrong with one of the gravimeters etc. However, even though this measurement so far must be considered an unsolved mystery, there is no doubt that the above-mentioned theory 1 and 2 predicted exactly such a strange behavior / anomaly a few months earlier that summer.

It is, of course, regrettable that the DTU team could not manage to start measurement 12 hours before the maximum lunar eclipse as this was (and still is) required to test the full range of the predicted anomaly 1 and 2.

If such a full set of data would have been available today, we would had seen that the (blue) absolute gravity measurement curve;

• would have increased gradually about 50 µGal twelve hours before the lunar eclipse

• would peak exactly by the maximum lunar eclipse,

• then, after the lunar eclipse, would gradually decrease (relative to the relative measurement) - as we have now seen by Figure 1.

This would, of course, (in addition to what has now been revealed) have shown a perfect cause effect coherence, underlining that the position of the Moon (from time to time) is, in a very predictable way, responsible for exposing Dark Flow Acceleration in a way so that DFA can be measured by much more effective and precise methods / devices than pendulum measurement.

Anyway, the measurement taken 7 on August 2017 should be a big hint showing that a significant aspect of science could very well have been almost entirely overlooked. Time must now have come for the scientific society to take the Allais effect much more seriously.

The next options to measure exposed DFA are 12 hours measurement before and after one of these eclipses is a minimum.

To get an even better overview, it is recommended to measure 36 hours before and after one or several of the eclipses mentioned above. In these cases, it is possible to compare measurement data taken the day before and the day after the eclipse (that will show no anomalous behavior) in contrast to the day of the eclipse when anomalies must be expected.

Also note the duration of eclipse anomalies are sometimes shorter or longer than 12 hours before and after the eclipse culmination. This can easy be calculated.

Statement of Competing Interests

Copyright © 2017 by author and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution International License (CC BY).

References

[1]  Bjarne Lorenzen (2017), The Cause of the Allais Effect Solved https://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=76756.
In article      View Article
 
[2]  Bjarne Lorenzen (2017), The Erratum to “The Cause of the Allais Effect Solved” http://file.scirp.org/Html/3-4500675_77930.htm.
In article      View Article
 
[3]  Temperature recorded Scoresbysund 7 of August 2017 https://www.wunderground.com/history/station/04341/2017/8/6/DailyHistory.html?req_city=&req_state=&req_statename=&reqdb.zip=&reqdb.magic=&reqdb.wmo=.
In article      View Article
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2017 Bjarne Lorenzen

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Cite this article:

Normal Style
Bjarne Lorenzen. Extension to the Cause of the Allais Effect Solved. Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2017, pp 26-27. http://pubs.sciepub.com/faac/3/2/3
MLA Style
Lorenzen, Bjarne. "Extension to the Cause of the Allais Effect Solved." Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology 3.2 (2017): 26-27.
APA Style
Lorenzen, B. (2017). Extension to the Cause of the Allais Effect Solved. Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology, 3(2), 26-27.
Chicago Style
Lorenzen, Bjarne. "Extension to the Cause of the Allais Effect Solved." Frontiers of Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology 3, no. 2 (2017): 26-27.
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  • Figure 1. Absolute and relative gravity measurement near Scoresbysund airport Starting 7 August at 21.50 UTC and ended 8 August at 09.08
[1]  Bjarne Lorenzen (2017), The Cause of the Allais Effect Solved https://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=76756.
In article      View Article
 
[2]  Bjarne Lorenzen (2017), The Erratum to “The Cause of the Allais Effect Solved” http://file.scirp.org/Html/3-4500675_77930.htm.
In article      View Article
 
[3]  Temperature recorded Scoresbysund 7 of August 2017 https://www.wunderground.com/history/station/04341/2017/8/6/DailyHistory.html?req_city=&req_state=&req_statename=&reqdb.zip=&reqdb.magic=&reqdb.wmo=.
In article      View Article