Ethno-botanical Survey of Traditional Medicine Practice for the Treatment of Cough, Diabetes, Diarrh...

A.H.M. Mahbubur Rahman

  Open Access OPEN ACCESS  Peer Reviewed PEER-REVIEWED

Ethno-botanical Survey of Traditional Medicine Practice for the Treatment of Cough, Diabetes, Diarrhea, Dysentery and Fever of Santals at Abdullahpur Village under Akkelpur Upazilla of Joypurhat District, Bangladesh

A.H.M. Mahbubur Rahman

Plant Taxonomy Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

Abstract

A comprehensive survey with the aim of documenting traditional medicinal practices was carried out during October 2012 to November 2013 of Santals at Abdullahpur Village under Akkelpur Upazilla of Joypurhat District, Bangladesh. This article focuses on the treatment of cough, diabetes, diarrhea, dysentery and fever. In the present medico-botanical survey, a total of 36 plant species under 36 genera and 25 families were collected and recorded for their use in various ailments. Habit analysis shows that herbs, shrubs, climbers and trees are represented by 13, 5, 4 and 14 species, respectively. For each species scientific name, local name, family, habit, mode of uses and part(s) used are provided.

Cite this article:

  • Rahman, A.H.M. Mahbubur. "Ethno-botanical Survey of Traditional Medicine Practice for the Treatment of Cough, Diabetes, Diarrhea, Dysentery and Fever of Santals at Abdullahpur Village under Akkelpur Upazilla of Joypurhat District, Bangladesh." Biomedicine and Biotechnology 1.2 (2013): 27-30.
  • Rahman, A. M. (2013). Ethno-botanical Survey of Traditional Medicine Practice for the Treatment of Cough, Diabetes, Diarrhea, Dysentery and Fever of Santals at Abdullahpur Village under Akkelpur Upazilla of Joypurhat District, Bangladesh. Biomedicine and Biotechnology, 1(2), 27-30.
  • Rahman, A.H.M. Mahbubur. "Ethno-botanical Survey of Traditional Medicine Practice for the Treatment of Cough, Diabetes, Diarrhea, Dysentery and Fever of Santals at Abdullahpur Village under Akkelpur Upazilla of Joypurhat District, Bangladesh." Biomedicine and Biotechnology 1, no. 2 (2013): 27-30.

Import into BibTeX Import into EndNote Import into RefMan Import into RefWorks

1. Introduction

Ethno-botany is the study of relationship between plants and people: From ‘ethno’-study of people and ‘-botany’- study of plants. Ethno-botany is considered as a branch of ethno-biology. Ethno-botany studies the complex relationships between (uses of) plants and cultures. The focus of ethno-botany is on how plants have been or are used, managed and perceived in human societies and includes plants used for food, medicine, divination, cosmetics, dyeing, and textiles, for building, tools, currency, clothing, rituals and social life [9].

Ethno-botany, in its totality, is virtually and old field with new dimension of research. And if this field is investigated thoroughly and systematically, it will yield results of great value missing the ethnologists, archaeologists, anthropologists, plant-geographers, ethno-botanists, botanists and linguists and ultimately to pharmacologists and phytochemists. It will appear to be a bridge between botany and medicinal plants, but in fact it is much more. It starts as step before ever botany in the sense supplies the 'idea' and the basic material for botanical research and study. It then takes us to the usefulness of medicinal plants. It goes a step further to help us in the application of the knowledge about the medicinal plants among the primitive people by rapport through the medicine men [8].

Over the past two decades several medicinal and ethno-botanical studies in Bangladesh have been carried out [2,3,11,13-27]. But none of them was devoted to ethno-botany in the study area. The article focused on the traditional medicinal practices used for the treatment of cough, diabetes, diarrhea, dysentery and fever of Santal community at Abdullahpur Village under Akkelpur Upazilla of Joypurhat district, Bangladesh

2. Methodology

2.1. Study Area

Akkelpur is an Upazilla of Joypurhat District in the Division of Rajshahi, Bangladesh. Akkelpur is located at 24°58′30″N 89°01′15″E 24.9750°N 89.0208°E, with a total area of 139.47 km². It is the smallest Upazilla in Joypurhat Zila. As of the 1991 Bangladesh census, Akkelpur has a population of 126,046, with It has 24,475 units of household as of the 1991 Census. Males constitute 52.9% of the population, and females 47.1%. This Upazilla's eighteen up population is 68033. Akkelpur has an average literacy rate of 34% (7+ years), and the national average of 32.4% literate. The annual rainfall is 1350mm. Temperature of the area is low in January varies from 9.0°C to 14.1°C. From February an increasing trend of temperature is found up to April and thereafter temperature start to decline. In April temperature varies from 22.6°C to 36.9°C. The mean relative humidity is found to be low in March (65%) and high in July-September (88-89%) [5].

2.2. Ethno-botanical Survey

In the present survey, a total of 36 plant species belonging to 36 genera and 25 families were recorded. A total of ten field trips were made for documentation. During the field interview, the information was noted in the documentation data sheet. All the information regarding plant species, biological forms, habitat, local names and uses was documented. Medicinal information was obtained through informal interviews following semi-structured from knowledgeable person’s particularly local Kabiraj/Herbalists and elderly people. Plant specimens were collected with flowers and fruits and processed using standard herbarium techniques [4]. The specimens were identified consulting with the experts, by comparing herbarium specimens and available literatures [1, 7, 10, 12]. The voucher specimens are stored at Rajshahi University Herbarium (RUH) for future reference.

Table 1. List of medicinal plants and their use in cough, diabetes, dysentery, diarrhea and fever of Santals in Joypurhat district of Bangladesh

3. Results and Discussion

In the present survey, a total of 36 plant species belonging to 36 genera and 25 families were recorded Table 1. Out of these plants species, 13 (36.11%) belonged to herbs, 14 (38.88%) trees, 5 (13.88%) shrubs, and 4 (11.11%) climbers Table 1. For each species scientific name, local name, family, habit, mode of uses and part(s) used are provided. The most frequently used species for the treatment of cough, diabetes, diarrhea, dysentery and fever diseases are Aegle marmelos, Alstonia scholaris, Andrographis paniculata, Allium cepa, Ananas comosus, Argemone Mexicana, Artocarpus heterophyllus, Averrhoa carambola, Bombax ceiba, Carica papaya, Centella asiatica, Dillenia indica, Erythrina variegata, Ficus racemosa, Justicia adhatoda, Mimosa pudica, Moringa oleifera, Ocimum sanctum, Phyllanthus emblica, and Vitex negundo.

Use of plant parts as medicine shows variation Table 1. Fruits (33.33%) are the leading part used in a majority of medicinal plants followed by 27.77% root, 11.11% bark, 2.77% seed, 8.33% whole plant, 5.55% stem, 2.77% bulb and 22.22% leaf. Distribution of medicinal plant species in the families shows variation Table 1. Each of Fabaceae and Lamiaceae is represented by 3 species. A single species in each was recorded by 17 families while two species in each was recorded by 6 families. The survey has also recorded 5 categories of uses of 36 medicinal plants Table 1. This is the indication of rich knowledge of medicinal uses of plants by the Santals in the study area. Among them, 15 (41.66%) species were used to cure fever, 12 (33.33%) species for each of dysentery, 9 (25.00%) species for diabetes, 8 (22.22%) species for diarrhea and 6 (16.66%) species for cough. The survey indicated that the common medicinal plant families in the study area are Acanthaceae, Amaranthaceae, Apocynaceae, Annonaceae, Averrhoaceae, Apiaceae, Arecaceae, Bombacaceae, Bromeliaceae, Caricaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Liliaceae, Moraceae and Rutaceae. This finding of common medicinal plant families in the study is in agreement with [6, 28].

4. Conclusions

The present findings are the first record of ethno-botanical survey of traditional medicine Practice for the treatment of cough, diabetes, diarrhea, dysentery and fever of Santals at Abdullahpur Village under Akkelpur Upazilla of Joypurhat District, Bangladesh using standard research protocols. A total of 36 plant species under 36 genera of 25 families have been documented which are used for the treatment of 5 important human diseases. The present study may be a preliminary contribution to the medicinal knowledge of this area using standard research methods, focusing on medicinal plants and their local uses for the healthcare. This healthcare knowledge transmitted orally from one generation to generation. The study also suggested that the present information on medicinal plants by the Santals may be used for botanical and pharmacological research in future for the development of new sources of drugs.

Acknowledgement

The author is grateful to the Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh for financial support to complete this research work. Thanks are also due to the Santal community at Abdullahpur Village under Akkelpur Upazilla of Joypurhat District, Bangladesh for their co-operation and help during the ethno-botanical studies.

References

[1]  Ahmed, Z. U., Begum, Z. N., Hassan, M.A., Khondker, M., Kabir, S. M. H., Ahmad, M., Ahmed, A. T. A., Rahman, A.K.A., Haque, E. U. (Eds). Encyclopedia of Flora and Fauna of Bangladesh. Angiosperms; Dicotyledons. Vols. 6-12. Asiat. Soc. Bangladesh, Dhaka. 2007-2009.
In article      
 
[2]  Alam, M. K. Medical ethno-botany of the Marma tribe of Bangladesh. Economic Botany, 46(3): 330-335. 1992.
In article      CrossRef
 
[3]  Anisuzzamam, M., Rahman, A. H. M.M., Harun-Or-Rashid, M., Zaman, A. T. M. N., Islam, A. K. M. R. An Ethnobotanical Study of Madhupur, Tangail. Jour. App. Sci. Res. 3(7): 519-530. 2007.
In article      
 
[4]  Alexiades, M. N. (Ed). Selected Guidelines for Ethno Botanical Research: A Field Manual. The New York Botanical Garden, New York. 1996.
In article      PubMed
 
[5]  BBS (Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics). Statistical Year Book of Bangladesh, 23rd edition, Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Planning Division, Ministry of Planning Government of Peoples Republic of Bangladesh, Dhaka, 1991. Retrieved November 10, 2006.
In article      
 
[6]  Ghani, A. Medicinal Plants of Bangladesh. Asiatic Society of Bangladesh, Dhaka. 1998.
In article      
 
[7]  Hooker, J.D. Flora of British India, Vols. 1-7. Reeve and Co. Ltd., London. 1961.
In article      
 
[8]  Jain, S. K. Dictionary of Indian Folk Medicine and Ethnobotany. Deep Publication, New Delhi, India. 1991.
In article      
 
[9]  Jain, S. K. Glimpses of Indian Ethnobotany. Oxford & IBH Publishing Co. New Delhi, India. 1996.
In article      
 
[10]  Kirtikar, K. R., Basu, B. D. Indian Medicinal Plants, Vols. 1-5. Bishen Singh Mahendra pal Singh, Dehra Dun, India. 1982.
In article      
 
[11]  Khan, M.S. Prospects of Ethnobotany and Ethnobotanical Research in Bangladesh. In: Banik RL, Alam MK, Pei SJ, Rastogi A (eds.), Applied Ethnobotany, BFRI, Chittagong, Bangladesh, pp 24-27. 1998.
In article      PubMed
 
[12]  Prain, D. Bengal Plants, Vols. 1-2, Botanical Survey of India, Calcutta. 1963.
In article      
 
[13]  Rahman, A. H. M.M., Anisuzzaman, M., Haider, S.A., Ahmed, F., Islam, A. K. M. R., Naderuzzaman, A. T. M. Study of Medicinal Plants in the Graveyards of Rajshahi City. Res. J. Agri. Bio. Sci. 4(1): 70-74. 2008.
In article      
 
[14]  Rahman, A. H. M.M., Kabi,r E. Z. M. F., Sima, S. N., Sultana, R. S., Nasiruddin, M., Zaman, A. T. M. N. Study of an Ethnobotany at the Village Dohanagar, Naogaon. J. App. Sci. Res. 6(9): 1466-1473. 2010.
In article      
 
[15]  Rahman, A. H. M.M., Gulsan, J. E., Alam, M.S., Ahmad, S., Naderuzzaman, A. T. M., Islam, A. K. M. R. An Ethnobotanical Portrait of a Village: Koikuri, Dinajpur with Reference to Medicinal Plants. Int. J. Biosci. 2(7), 1-10. 2012.
In article      
 
[16]  Rahman, A. H. M.M. Medico-botanical study of the plants found in the Rajshahi district of Bangladesh. Prudence J. Med. Plants Res. 1(1): 1-8. 2013.
In article      
 
[17]  Rahman, A. H. M.M. Medico-Ethnobotany: A study on the tribal people of Rajshahi Division, Bangladesh. Peak J. Med. Plants Res. 1(1): 1-8. 2013.
In article      
 
[18]  Rahman, A. H. M.M. Ethno-medico-botanical investigation on cucurbits of the Rajshahi Division, Bangladesh. Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies. 1(3): 118-125. 2013.
In article      
 
[19]  Rahman, A. H. M.M. Ethno-medicinal investigation on ethnic community in the northern region of Bangladesh. American Journal of Life Sciences. 1(2): 77-81. 2013.
In article      CrossRef
 
[20]  Rahman, A. H. M. M, Graveyards angiosperm diversity of Rajshahi city, Bangladesh with emphasis on medicinal plants. American Journal of Life Sciences. 1 (3): 98-104. 2013.
In article      CrossRef
 
[21]  Rahman A H M M, Saika Kabir Nitu, Zannatul Ferdows and A K M Rafiul Islam. 2013. Medico-botany on herbaceous plants of Rajshahi, Bangladesh. American Journal of Life Sciences. 1(3): 136-144.
In article      CrossRef
 
[22]  Rahman, A. H. M.M., Sultana, N., Islam, A. K. M. R., Zaman, A. T. M. N. Study of Medical Ethno-botany of traditional medicinal plants used by local people at the village Genda under Savar Upazilla of district Dhaka, Bangladesh. Online International Journal of Medicinal Plants Research. 2(1): 18-31. 2013.
In article      
 
[23]  Rahman, A. H. M.M., Khanom, A. Taxonomic and Ethno-Medicinal Study of Species from Moraceae (Mulberry) Family in Bangladesh Flora. Research in Plant Sciences. 1(3): 53-57. 2013.
In article      
 
[24]  Rahman, A. H. M.M. Assessment of Angiosperm Weeds of Rajshahi, Bangladesh with emphasis on medicinal plants. Research in Plant Sciences. 1(3): 62-67. 2013.
In article      
 
[25]  Rahman, A, H, M, M, Kabir, E. Z. M. F., Islam, A. K. M. R., Zaman, A. T. M. N. Medico-botanical investigation by the tribal people of Naogaon district, Bangladesh. J. Med. Plants Studies. 1(4): 136-147. 2013.
In article      
 
[26]  Rahman, A. H. M.M. Medico-botanical study of commonly used angiosperm weeds of Rajshahi district, Bangladesh. Wudpecker J. Med. Plants. 2(3): 44-52. 2013.
In article      
 
[27]  Sajib, N. H., Uddin, S. B. Medico-botanical studies of Sandip Island in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Bangladesh J. Plant Taxon. 20(1): 39-49. 2013.
In article      
 
[28]  Yusuf, M., Begum, J., Hoque, M. N., Choudhury, J. U. Medicinal plants of Bangladesh-Revised and Enlarged. Bangladesh Coun. Sci. Ind. Res. Lab. Chittagong, Bangladesh. 2009.
In article      
 
  • CiteULikeCiteULike
  • Digg ThisDigg
  • MendeleyMendeley
  • RedditReddit
  • Google+Google+
  • StumbleUponStumbleUpon
  • Add to DeliciousDelicious
  • FacebookFacebook
  • TwitterTwitter
  • LinkedInLinkedIn