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Research Article
Open Access Peer-reviewed

Impact Assessment of UMEED (NRLM) on Rural SHG Women

Javaid Ahmad Mir
American Journal of Rural Development. 2017, 5(5), 121-122. DOI: 10.12691/ajrd-5-5-1
Published online: October 19, 2017

Abstract

This Research paper is based on an empirical study that sought to assess the impact of UMEED sheme, (common name of NRLM in JK) a poverty reduction programme, in Block Chenani of JK on Women Federated in SHGs. The highlights, the ways of Beneficiary Identifications, types of capitalization, nature of Federations, Livelihood Profile, Cadre structure etc. The study strived to gain insight on average savings, Bank linkages etc. The outcome of the Study is based on research design based on three modes of data collection as Sampling and pry data Collection , Secondary data analysis and Focused Group Discussion.

1. Introduction

A systematic review of SGSY (Swarnajayanti Gram Swarojgar Yojana, 1999) has highlighted certain lacunas like vast regional variations in mobilization of rural poor; insufficient capacity building of beneficiaries; unsustainable Primary Institutions (SHG), and weak linkages with credit institutions like banks etc. The Scheme has been found poor in Leading SHGs to credit mobilization and repeat financing. Even states failed to utilize the adequate funds. Non federated nature of institutions of rural poor, under SGSY was one of the main reasons for its weak impact. Several evaluation studies have shown that SGSY scheme has been relatively successful in alleviating rural poverty wherever systematic mobilization of the poor into SHGs and their capacity building and skill development has been taken up in a process-intensive manner. In other places, the impact has not been that significant. Keeping in view the enormous unfinished work under SGSY, a restructured programe like NRLM came into existence. NRLM’s mandate is to reach out to all rural poor families, link them to sustainable livelihoods opportunities and nurture them till they come out of poverty and enjoy a decent quality of life. NRLM Puts dedicated professional Support structure to guide the poor. States has been encouraged to constitute their own State livelihood Societies for the implementation. In Chenani Block of Udhampur District ( J&K) NRLM is being implemented by name UMEED in year 2014. Since the inception, out of 49 Gram panchyats all has been covered up to Dec 2016 and the SHGS has been formed by PIP method. In block Chenani 715 SHGs were formed which comprises 7356 households identified as poor. This research paper tries to study the outreach to different disadvantaged sections among rural poor, the availability of credit to the institutions, the level of risk taking behavior for availing loans and the kind of approach to enhance, upgrade community based livelihood options or to choose the secondary livelihoods

2. Methodology

The Research paper is based on three pronged approach to implicit the data

a) Random sampling

b) Analysis of official Data available at Block Head Quarters

c) Focused Group Discussion

2.1. Random Sampling of the SHG Population

100 SHG women were randomly interviewed on four measurable Indicators, believed to be among core objectives of the scheme and analyzed for the results.

It has been found that 92% of poor women have taken loans and the average loan amount taken so for is RS 53, 000. The option of investing on livelihood is purely community based decision, wherein the 80 % of women opted for upgrading of their indigenous or existing livelihoods keeping in view their skill and market linkage.

2.2. Analysis of Official Data Available at Block Head Quarters

Data from MIS (Management Information System) and Block MPRs was analyzed to know about the inclusion of disadvantaged sections, Group Saving, Capitalization; It is pertinent to present the following observations which emerged out of the Exercise


2.2.1. Inclusion of Disadvantaged Groups by PIP Methods

A women’s self-help group, coming together on the basis of mutual affinity is the primary building block of the NRLM community institutional design. Is it evident from the Data that there is presence of 36% SC and ST groups, and good percentage of Muslim minority Predominantly SHGs. The inclusion is attributed to PIP Method; the widely accepted method works like a snow ball sampling technique, here poor themselves identify other poor and federate into the groups.


2.2.2. Individual Bank Accounts of Associated Women

For most of us, having a bank account is as natural as breathing, but there is huge population of Rural people who don’t have a bank account, Typically, the unbanked and under banked tend to be poor and working class people who choose to stay away because they either don't have the financial resources to maintain a bank account, or lack knowledge of how the banking system works. The UMEED had a great impact on the SHG women associated to have their own individual Bank account. Among seven thousand SHG women in Block above five thousand are with individual Bank account


2.2.3. Saving within the Group

Every individual has the tendency to save the money to meet the demands of his/her future. But poor people are unable to do so as; they don’t have sufficient income to save after meeting their daily expenses. At the time of Inception of NRLM in the Block, there has been no concept of saving among the federated women. After inclusion they followed the scheme of panchsutra (Five basic Principles of a successful SHG), among five the 2nd important guiding principle is the Group saving. RS 1.94 crore has been saved by women in Block. The average Group saving is Rs 27000 whereas average individual saving is RS 2771.


2.2.4. Financial Inclusion & Availability and Reception of Loans

The impact of Mission on the Micro- finance and linkage to available sources of Credit has been pivotal. The SHGs has been capitalized as per the set timeline, and credit available is in various shapes and specific names like Revolving Fund, Community Investment Fund and Vulnerability Reduction Fund and bank credit available on interest subversion.

2.3. Focused Group Discussion

The exercise helped to record the views of different cross sections of the stakeholders, and their opinion about the qualitative impact of the scheme. The community views it a decentralized scheme with 100% participation of women, the ownership of the scheme is key factor for the success or failure of the scheme, herein the community acknowledges that their institutions are owned by them, they run and manage the institutions, themselves where state acts as the sensitive support to facilitate the process. The emergence of the Cadre from the community is envisaged as another qualitative change the scheme has brought in its implementation approach The stake holders are also of the opinion that One is the reasons for being poor is the reluctance to take loans is available, as the poor always fear that they will be always in debut trap if the livelihood they are opting is going to a flop, but by constant capacity building under the scheme has increased their risk taking capacity.

3. Conclusion

Though the scheme is in implementation from couple of years, thus a holistic perceptual Prototype of the scheme can’t be drawn with the help of this study but still from the community perspective and analysis of the data, it can be said that UMEED is bringing a positive change by adhering to its core principles and objectives, a Federated structure of the institutions is in place, the Micro-credit is managed democratically and there is a sound and adhered relation of Institutions with Financial Bodies like Banks for Credit Linkages.

References

[1]  http://www.aajeevika.gov.in/nrlm/NRLM.
In article      View Article
 
[2]  The Global Journal of Finance and Economics, Vol. 10, No. 2, (2013) : 205-214
In article      
 
[3]  The Journal of Peasant Studies ISSN: 0306-6150 (Print) 1743-9361 (Online) Journal homepage
In article      
 
[4]  Journal on Rural Development, vol.59, October 2011 www.rbi.org.in www.nabard.org.in
In article      View Article
 
[5]  K.Venu Gopal Rao, Anti-Poverty and Rural Development (Delhi: Mangalam Publications, 2010).
In article      
 
[6]  Katar Singh, Rural Development: Principles, Policies and Management (Delhi: Sage Publications, 1986).
In article      
 
[7]  Umeed JK Website.
In article      
 
[8]  Indian school of micro finance (sampark).
In article      
 
[9]  Satyasai, P. A (1999). Impact evaluation of SHGs.
In article      
 
[10]  Joyce, E. (2001). Credit Options, Human Resource Development and the Sustainability of.
In article      
 
[11]  Women’s Projects.
In article      
 
[12]  Centre for Microfinance (2006). PEDO's SHG Programme Impact Assessment.
In article      
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2017 Javaid Ahmad Mir

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Cite this article:

Normal Style
Javaid Ahmad Mir. Impact Assessment of UMEED (NRLM) on Rural SHG Women. American Journal of Rural Development. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp 121-122. http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajrd/5/5/1
MLA Style
Mir, Javaid Ahmad. "Impact Assessment of UMEED (NRLM) on Rural SHG Women." American Journal of Rural Development 5.5 (2017): 121-122.
APA Style
Mir, J. A. (2017). Impact Assessment of UMEED (NRLM) on Rural SHG Women. American Journal of Rural Development, 5(5), 121-122.
Chicago Style
Mir, Javaid Ahmad. "Impact Assessment of UMEED (NRLM) on Rural SHG Women." American Journal of Rural Development 5, no. 5 (2017): 121-122.
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[1]  http://www.aajeevika.gov.in/nrlm/NRLM.
In article      View Article
 
[2]  The Global Journal of Finance and Economics, Vol. 10, No. 2, (2013) : 205-214
In article      
 
[3]  The Journal of Peasant Studies ISSN: 0306-6150 (Print) 1743-9361 (Online) Journal homepage
In article      
 
[4]  Journal on Rural Development, vol.59, October 2011 www.rbi.org.in www.nabard.org.in
In article      View Article
 
[5]  K.Venu Gopal Rao, Anti-Poverty and Rural Development (Delhi: Mangalam Publications, 2010).
In article      
 
[6]  Katar Singh, Rural Development: Principles, Policies and Management (Delhi: Sage Publications, 1986).
In article      
 
[7]  Umeed JK Website.
In article      
 
[8]  Indian school of micro finance (sampark).
In article      
 
[9]  Satyasai, P. A (1999). Impact evaluation of SHGs.
In article      
 
[10]  Joyce, E. (2001). Credit Options, Human Resource Development and the Sustainability of.
In article      
 
[11]  Women’s Projects.
In article      
 
[12]  Centre for Microfinance (2006). PEDO's SHG Programme Impact Assessment.
In article