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Schizophrenia: An Observational Study and Demonstration that Alpha-emitting Nanoparticulates Effect Is not Hereditary but Direct in the Brain (Explaining Core Relation with TBI)

Florent Pirot
American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2020, 8(12), 453-455. DOI: 10.12691/ajmcr-8-12-5
Received July 20, 2020; Revised August 22, 2020; Accepted August 31, 2020

Abstract

A case study (with involvement of the author in various observational settings and many subjects) leads to confirmation of the general link between schizophrenia and traumatic brain injury that was already underlined in the existing literature. The effects of the welfare State conceal the core idea that schizophrenia can hence be healed radically because the existence of monetary incomes for people suffering of mental disease triggers an incentive to self-contaminate and maintain the state of dereliction of the brain instead of actually contributing to society. This case study allows to prove that second statement and to confirm as well general demands of French economist Jacques Rueff. The issue of marijuana risks is also discussed, confirming the dangers of marijuana (THC, THCa only) in a situation in which the brain is contaminated.

1. Introduction

There already is literature demonstrating the endocrine disruption effect of alpha-emitting nanoparticles as well as their various neurological effects, all linked to the decay energy - see for instance 1 on the endocrine disruption effect, 2 on epilepsy, dementia and Alzheimer’s and 3 on traumatic brain injury, impulsivity, apathy, impaired alertness and neurodegenerative disorders in general. The transmission of signals inside the brain may be interrupted at each moment by an alpha decay hitting on the channel (neuron for instance) through which that signal was to transit, hence modifying the resulting message. Likewise, endocrine disruption from alpha decay hitting on glands, triggering a change in their production rate (be it an acceleration in the production due to cell proliferation in the gland linked to the bystander effect 4, so that these newborn cells increase the secretion of these hormones, or a decrease linked to cell death in these glands, depending on the proximity of the alpha-emitting nanoparticles to the cells in that gland{1}) will also affect the hormonal balance.

2. The Emergence of Uncontrolled Behaviors

The combination of an abnormal hormonal balance and of abnormal signaling can be expected to lead to acts, movements with hands, legs, for instance, that only some subparts of the brain controlled as they were in the receiving part of a signal that was deformed by internal contamination with alpha-emitting nanoparticles through the above processes, and these subparts may be influenced by hormones that do not correspond to what the core parts of the brain demanded, due to interference of alpha-emitting nanoparticulates on the endocrine system, leading to a discrepancy between feelings in the subjects and acts.

Another issue relates to the circulation of hormones through the bloodstream: when alpha-emitting nanoparticulates are co-present in the bloodstream, their alpha decay can also break molecules, leading to another kind of interference in signaling.

In these two cases, due to direct impact on nerves and/or hormonal glands or destruction ex-post of their product in the bloodstream, the affects of the subject can remain silent, or even be distorted, leading to e.g. actions of “pulling the trigger” without consent of the central brain.

The medulla oblongata and the spinal cord may as well be damaged by contamination, leading to changes in the core components of the cerebral activity, and hence for instance to brutal changes of temper as a single alpha decay impacting that key area can lead to a change in the meaning of a neurotransmitted order that affects the entire brain.

The case study here shows the uncontrolled behaviour of using cigarettes’ polonium 210 and other alpha emitters (from contamination of the phosphated fertilizers used to grow tobacco faster) to foster brain damage and enjoy the comfort of social welfare checks. This was observed by the author over a very long period of time. The author benefitted from the opportunity of visiting several mental hospitals and could see, in such facilities the key role of cigarette consumption as “social activity” with, actually, very precise rules in the trade of such products between occupants showing there is a mathematic, possibly related to the time occupants desire to stay. The case study also suggests will of the subjects to share the alpha-emitting pollution as a kind of gift together with a culture in which “having intelligence is condemned”. This was observed in a plurality of settings.

The case study also suggests attempts of the governmental authorities at reducing the tendency, through increases in prices of cigarettes, making mental health facilities poor in general, i.e. preliminary understanding of the issue that socialism is the root of the problem.

3. The Growth of a Schizophrenic Brain: the Key of Alpha-emitting Nanoparticulates

The strong association between schizophrenia and alpha-emitting nanoparticulates was proven already in 1 but it is possible to hypothesize that it is not a genetic condition (linked to parental contamination) but a purely environmental issue - the study of traumatic brain injury, in 3 can be related to the meta-analysis that suggested an increased schizophrenia risk after TBI 5 to suggest the simple link with direct internal contamination of the subject.

The many patterns in genes that are found to correspond with schizophrenia can simply be the result of direct internal contamination of subjects with alpha-emitting nanoparticulates leading as well, in addition to all the above, to mutations in their DNA, where then, hereafter, the findings of DNA mutations are believed to be the explanation of schizophrenia when they in fact are simply a co-condition, with DNA damage caused by the internal contamination whereas the same internal contamination also leads to direct impact onto neurotransmission, the endocrine system etc. causing the schizophrenia symptoms.

The strong association of schizophrenia with marijuana can, first, simply be related to alpha decay from the alpha-emitting nanoparticulates impacting the endocannabinoïd receptors CB1 and CB2 on a number of cells in the brain, damaging them and hence interfering with signaling, so that in a contaminated brain, the consumption of marijuana strongly accelerates (due to the bystander effect of alpha-emitting nanoparticulates 4) cell proliferation in areas where normal signaling would have blocked it but where CB1 and CB2 were damaged, as marijuana has known properties in the acceleration of cell proliferation (see for instance 6) that are not regulated anymore by the endocannabinoïd receptors (see for instance 7 and, on cannabinoïd regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, 8, 9).

Another pattern on alpha-emitting nanoparticulates, marijuana and schizophrenia relates to localized DNA damage caused by alpha-emitting nanoparticulates leading to mosaïcism, partial dysfunction of the endocannabinoïd system because of that local DNA damage, and hence, again, partial loss of control after marijuana intake and localized “tumoral” growths in the brain paving the way to the schizophrenia diagnosis. Each of these tumoral growths are secluded areas in which the mind of the subject gets “lost” sometimes.

The proof of the environmental cause of alpha-emitting nanoparticulates in schizophrenia is provided by average low pH results in brains with schizophrenia diagnosis - in 10 - the positive charge of the alpha decays from internal contamination decreases the average pH in the brain (even though there are some beta decays in the decay chains of natural radioactivity these chains are dominated by alpha decay) - the authors of the study actually indicate that this low pH is “implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder”. This statement is essential.

Hence there is a certain pattern in which the interference of alpha-emitting nanoparticulates leads to strong changes in the internal organization of the brain, making marijuana a dangerous contributor to the crystallization of such changes after endocannabinoïd receptors are damaged & even destroyed by alpha-emitting nanoparticulates, and hence to the definitive settling of schizophrenic personalities.

This pattern does not obfuscate the existence of other patterns, related for instance mostly with external physical shocks leading to destruction of some key brain functions, but the extreme varsity of sources of contamination with alpha-emitting nanoparticulates, from radon to “NORMs”, beyond the military sources of contamination, their presence everywhere in the environment at varying levels makes them an unavoidable factor.

In the case study, the subjects are known for consuming marijuana, marijuana triggered schizophrenia at age 18 for the main subject (very typical “decompensation” case) and marijuana is always consumed in combination with cigarette extracts, making it strictly useless.

It is nevertheless clear that due to the social welfare associated with schizophrenia diagnosis there is an incentive for people to develop processes of deliberate self-contamination (as here with polonium 210 in cigarettes).

It is interesting to underline that the subjects of this particular case study got very, very active warnings from the author about alpha-emitting nanoparticulates and their dangers for health, on cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, birth defects etc. and they nevertheless ignore these warnings deliberately, it appears that the subjects have a clear desire to self-contaminate to legitimate their admission in medical facilities and ensure conservation of the social welfare benefits.

4. Conclusion

This article gives a perspective on impulsive behaviors, cannabis and gun violence. Cases of violence with the ex-post police questioning of the subject leading to no finding, since all causes of the violent action were, simply, honestly forgotten by their author (and diagnosis of psychotic disorder, orientation to a mental hospital instead of prison), can be explained rationally. In neurology, alpha-emitting nanoparticles are key, and interfere with signaling in the brain. Impulsivity, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, for instance are already typically explained by such internal contamination with alpha emitters and there is an array of situations in which strong internal contamination naturally explains the progressive division in blocks of the subject’s brain and the possibility that actions are decided by the subject against its own emotions due to the interference of alpha decay on neurotransmission, hormone production and distribution as well as internal hemorrhages, and damage on the endocannabinoïd system, directly or indirectly (after DNA damage).

Governmental policies cannot avoid to explain the truth of alpha-emitting nanoparticulates if they want to fit with the general neoliberal orientation of public policies, or else such governmental policies will be indeed schizophrenic.

Note

1. At a certain distance bystander effect (proliferation), at close contact cell death

References

[1]  Pirot, F, “Alpha-emitting nanoparticulates, the forgotten pollutant”, in From an Einstein Syndrome to the People, 2019, Editions universitaires européennes.
In article      
 
[2]  Pirot, F. “The link between salt and neurological disorders -the mediation of alpha-emitting nanoparticulates as simple explanation”, Porto Biomedical Journal, 4 (6). pe 55. 2019.
In article      View Article
 
[3]  Pirot, F. 'Traumatic Brain Injury: a Case Report and Its Contribution to Understanding the Underlying Mechanisms - Alpha-Emitting Nanoparticulates Proven as Key.' American Journal of Medical Case Reports 8, no. 4 (2020): 100-102.
In article      
 
[4]  Miller AC, Rivas R, Tesoro L, Kovalenko G, Kovaric N, Pavlovic P, Brenner D, “Radiation exposure from depleted uranium: The radiation bystander effect”, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 331 (15). 135-141. Sept 2017.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[5]  Molloy, C., Conroy, R. M., Cotter, D. R., & Cannon, M. (2011). Is traumatic brain injury a risk factor for schizophrenia? A meta-analysis of case-controlled population-based studies. Schizophrenia bulletin, 37(6), 1104-1110.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[6]  Hart S, Fischer OM, Ullrich A. Cannabinoids induce cancer cell proliferation via tumor necrosis factor alpha-converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17)-mediated transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. Cancer Res. 2004; 64(6): 1943-1950.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[7]  Khan, M. I., Sobocińska, A. A., Brodaczewska, K. K., Zielniok, K., Gajewska, M., Kieda, C., Czarnecka, A. M., & Szczylik, C, Involvement of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor in cell growth inhibition and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 in renal cell carcinoma. BMC Cancer 18, 583 (2018).
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[8]  Galve-Roperh I, Chiurchiù V, Díaz-Alonso J, Bari M, Guzmán M, Maccarrone M. Cannabinoid receptor signaling in progenitor/stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Prog Lipid Res. 2013; 52(4): 633-650.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[9]  De Petrocellis L, Melck D, Palmisano A, Bisogno T, Laezza C, Bifulco M, Di Marzo V. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998 Jul 7; 95(14): 8375-80.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[10]  Hagihara, H., Catts, V. S., Katayama, Y., Shoji, H., Takagi, T., Huang, F. L., Nakao, A., Mori, Y., Huang, K. P., Ishii, S., Graef, I. A., Nakayama, K. I., Shannon Weickert, C., & Miyakawa, T. (2018). Decreased Brain pH as a Shared Endophenotype of Psychiatric Disorders. Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 43(3), 459-468.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2020 Florent Pirot

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Cite this article:

Normal Style
Florent Pirot. Schizophrenia: An Observational Study and Demonstration that Alpha-emitting Nanoparticulates Effect Is not Hereditary but Direct in the Brain (Explaining Core Relation with TBI). American Journal of Medical Case Reports. Vol. 8, No. 12, 2020, pp 453-455. http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajmcr/8/12/5
MLA Style
Pirot, Florent. "Schizophrenia: An Observational Study and Demonstration that Alpha-emitting Nanoparticulates Effect Is not Hereditary but Direct in the Brain (Explaining Core Relation with TBI)." American Journal of Medical Case Reports 8.12 (2020): 453-455.
APA Style
Pirot, F. (2020). Schizophrenia: An Observational Study and Demonstration that Alpha-emitting Nanoparticulates Effect Is not Hereditary but Direct in the Brain (Explaining Core Relation with TBI). American Journal of Medical Case Reports, 8(12), 453-455.
Chicago Style
Pirot, Florent. "Schizophrenia: An Observational Study and Demonstration that Alpha-emitting Nanoparticulates Effect Is not Hereditary but Direct in the Brain (Explaining Core Relation with TBI)." American Journal of Medical Case Reports 8, no. 12 (2020): 453-455.
Share
[1]  Pirot, F, “Alpha-emitting nanoparticulates, the forgotten pollutant”, in From an Einstein Syndrome to the People, 2019, Editions universitaires européennes.
In article      
 
[2]  Pirot, F. “The link between salt and neurological disorders -the mediation of alpha-emitting nanoparticulates as simple explanation”, Porto Biomedical Journal, 4 (6). pe 55. 2019.
In article      View Article
 
[3]  Pirot, F. 'Traumatic Brain Injury: a Case Report and Its Contribution to Understanding the Underlying Mechanisms - Alpha-Emitting Nanoparticulates Proven as Key.' American Journal of Medical Case Reports 8, no. 4 (2020): 100-102.
In article      
 
[4]  Miller AC, Rivas R, Tesoro L, Kovalenko G, Kovaric N, Pavlovic P, Brenner D, “Radiation exposure from depleted uranium: The radiation bystander effect”, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 331 (15). 135-141. Sept 2017.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[5]  Molloy, C., Conroy, R. M., Cotter, D. R., & Cannon, M. (2011). Is traumatic brain injury a risk factor for schizophrenia? A meta-analysis of case-controlled population-based studies. Schizophrenia bulletin, 37(6), 1104-1110.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[6]  Hart S, Fischer OM, Ullrich A. Cannabinoids induce cancer cell proliferation via tumor necrosis factor alpha-converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17)-mediated transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. Cancer Res. 2004; 64(6): 1943-1950.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[7]  Khan, M. I., Sobocińska, A. A., Brodaczewska, K. K., Zielniok, K., Gajewska, M., Kieda, C., Czarnecka, A. M., & Szczylik, C, Involvement of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor in cell growth inhibition and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 in renal cell carcinoma. BMC Cancer 18, 583 (2018).
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[8]  Galve-Roperh I, Chiurchiù V, Díaz-Alonso J, Bari M, Guzmán M, Maccarrone M. Cannabinoid receptor signaling in progenitor/stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Prog Lipid Res. 2013; 52(4): 633-650.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[9]  De Petrocellis L, Melck D, Palmisano A, Bisogno T, Laezza C, Bifulco M, Di Marzo V. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998 Jul 7; 95(14): 8375-80.
In article      View Article  PubMed
 
[10]  Hagihara, H., Catts, V. S., Katayama, Y., Shoji, H., Takagi, T., Huang, F. L., Nakao, A., Mori, Y., Huang, K. P., Ishii, S., Graef, I. A., Nakayama, K. I., Shannon Weickert, C., & Miyakawa, T. (2018). Decreased Brain pH as a Shared Endophenotype of Psychiatric Disorders. Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 43(3), 459-468.
In article      View Article  PubMed