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Research Article
Open Access Peer-reviewed

Is the Online Internet Streaming Going to Kill TV/Cable by 2025?

Arun Agarwal , Kabita Agarwal, Gourav Misra, Omkar Pabshetwar
American Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. 2019, 7(4), 91-93. DOI: 10.12691/ajeee-7-4-1
Received August 03, 2019; Revised September 04, 2019; Accepted September 06, 2019

Abstract

Once TV was a medium through which people get entertained but nowadays everybody is using online streaming and live video. The demand for TV which brings some characters and their stories to the audience would never go down. People following a particular show would always wait eagerly to know what would happen next. Just now the scenario has changed in such a way that technology helps the mass to view their favorite shows according to the time they wish to watch them.

1. Introduction

We often hear people getting addicted to Netflix or streaming videos of their favorite shows on the internet. 1 Once upon a time cable connection was the only way to watch your current favorite shows. But standing at 2018, we can observe and say that people are watching online videos and many more than the TV shows 1. Web series have been introduced for long years, but the time duration hardly extends between 5 to 6 mins. But, nowadays the time for web series have been increased to number of episodes. It is even noticed that big budget production houses have initiated investment in web series.

Some of the positive aspects of TV series is, there is a fair chance of producing a good and more popular one however, in case of web series it may be bit challenging. One of the prime reasons of TV is nowadays is getting less popular is web series like Netflix and Hulu. People are more attractive towards these web series rather watching any TV series. The television business has changed from provider-driven to consumer-driven. For broadcasters and operators – who used to decide whether content lived or died — the internet has proven to be a most disruptive development, looming menacingly over their profit stream. The internet is changing the TV business forever.

These changes affect the definition of TV itself; what do we really mean by television? It used to refer to a cabinet-like device, with scheduled programming on a small number of broadcast channels. It became cable, satellite and internet television (IPTV) with hundreds of channels. Today, viewers can watch football, drama, news and the latest cat video at will, sometimes simultaneously with their tablet or smartphones.

Viewers are in control, creating personal playlists while digital recorders, applications and TV web sites accommodate binge-watching. Commentary moves immediately to social media, not to a weekly TV Guide or the daily newspaper. YouTube and commercial content intermingle. This has been happening for years, but the TV industry is only starting to respond to its challenges.

2. How Internet will Replace TV?

Though the imminent death of television has been proclaimed many times, it has not become extinct and is not likely to. But the reach, and influence, of mass free-to-air broadcasting has been slowly declining for decades. Twenty years ago everyone watched the same shows. Since then the audience has become much more fragmented due to narrowcasting via cable and satellite.

Broadcast TV is being eaten from within, by narrowcast digital television - in which specialist content is aimed at subscription-based audiences and distributed via digital channels. But waiting in the wings is something even more devastating - Internet Protocol TV (IPtv) - television on demand, delivered via the internet. And it's coming soon to a computer screen near you.

The trouble for broadcast TV is that its business model depended on attracting mass audiences. Once audiences fragment, the commercial logic changes. And new technologies like personal video recorders (PVRs), which use hard drives rather than tape, enable viewers to determine their own viewing schedules and (more significantly) to avoid ads - think of Sky Plus, think of TiVO.

As the CEO of Yahoo! said recently at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the era of 'appointment-to-view' TV is coming to an end. This doesn't mean that broadcast TV will disappear, incidentally. That's not the way ecologists think. It will continue to exist for the simple reason that some things are best covered using a few-to-many technology. Only a broadcast model could deal with something like, say, a World Cup final. But it will lose its dominant position in the ecosystem, with profound consequences for us all.

The internet will take its place. Note that I do not say the web. The biggest mistake people in the media business make is to think that the net and the web are synonymous. They're not. The web is enormous, but it's just one kind of traffic that runs on the internet's tracks and signalling. And already it's being overtaken by other kinds of traffic. According to data gathered by the Cambridge firm Cachelogic, peer-to-peer networking traffic now exceeds web traffic by a factor of between two and 10, depending on the time of day. Already the signs of the net's approaching centrality are everywhere - in the astonishing spread of broadband, for example, together with the rise of online retailing, streaming media, Google and the explosive growth in internet telephony.

Naughton explains 6 why the internet is set to take over, using blogging and digital photography as examples:

The next generation will live in an environment dominated by the net. What will that mean for us - and for them? When thinking about the future, the most useful words are 'push' and 'pull' - they capture the essence of where we've been and where we're headed. Broadcast TV is a 'push' medium: a select band of producers (broadcasters) decide what content is to be created, create it and then push it down analogue or digital channels at audiences which are assumed to consist of essentially passive recipients. The couch potato was, par excellence, a creature of this world.

The web is the opposite of this. It's a 'pull' medium. Nothing comes to you unless you choose it and click on it to pull it down on to your computer. You're in charge. So the big implication of the switch from push to pull is a radical increase in consumer sovereignty. We saw this early on in e-commerce, because it became easy to compare online prices from the comfort of your own armchair.

Another big change is that it has become much harder to keep secrets. If one of your products has flaws, the chances are that the news will appear somewhere on a blog. Ask the company that makes Kryptonite bicycle locks, or Sony BMG - still licking its wounds from the drubbing it received at the hands of bloggers over the spyware covertly installed by its anti-copying technology. The emergence of a truly sovereign, informed consumer is thus one of the implications of an internet-centric world. The days when companies could assume that the only really demanding customers they would encounter were those who subscribed to Which? are over.

Another implication is that the asymmetry of the old push-media world is being overturned. The underlying assumption of the old broadcast model was that audiences were passive and uncreative. What we're now discovering is that that passivity may have been more due to the absence of tools and publication opportunities than to intrinsic defects in human nature.

Take blogging - the practice of keeping an online diary. Technorati, a blog-tracking service, currently claims to be monitoring nearly 29 million. New blogs are being created at the rate of about one a second. Many of them are merely vanity publishing with no discernible literary or intellectual merit, but something like 13 million are still being updated three months after their initial creation, and many contain writing and thinking of a very high order.

3. Is Internet Overtaking TV for good?

More and more people are turning to the Internet for their television content. But that doesn’t mean traditional TV has fallen off the map. Networks and providers are getting smart and following their subscribers to the Web 7.

Many major networks have deals that allow online streaming services access to shows after they air. And some even provide online streaming themselves.

Networks including Fox, ABC and NBC offer recent episodes of popular shows on their own websites.

The smartest networks are getting in on the mobile streaming game, too.

4. Conclusion

People are connected to everyone with the help of TV because everybody are coming together and watching TV serials. The demand for TV which brings some characters and their stories to the audience would never go down. People following a particular show would always wait eagerly to know what would happen next. Just now the scenario has changed in such a way that technology helps the mass to view their favorite shows according to the time they wish to watch them. This, in turn, is changing the overall fate of cable connection of television and people are getting glued to taking up streaming services 1.

References

[1]  https://www.praguepost.com/technology/how-modern-day-streaming-will-take-over-television
In article      
 
[2]  https://yourstory.com/2016/06/internet-media-india-report/
In article      
 
[3]  https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/business/india- business/number-indian-internet-users-will-reach-500-million-by- june-2018-iamai-says/articleshow/62998642.cms
In article      
 
[4]  https://www.recode.net/2018/6/8/17441288/internet-time-spent-tv-zenith-data-media
In article      
 
[5]  https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/281851
In article      
 
[6]  https://neweconomist.blogs.com/new_economist/2006/03/nothing_can_sto.html
In article      
 
[7]  https://www.brandwatch.com/blog/has-the-internet-taken-over-tv/
In article      
 

Published with license by Science and Education Publishing, Copyright © 2019 Arun Agarwal, Kabita Agarwal, Gourav Misra and Omkar Pabshetwar

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Cite this article:

Normal Style
Arun Agarwal, Kabita Agarwal, Gourav Misra, Omkar Pabshetwar. Is the Online Internet Streaming Going to Kill TV/Cable by 2025?. American Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. Vol. 7, No. 4, 2019, pp 91-93. http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajeee/7/4/1
MLA Style
Agarwal, Arun, et al. "Is the Online Internet Streaming Going to Kill TV/Cable by 2025?." American Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering 7.4 (2019): 91-93.
APA Style
Agarwal, A. , Agarwal, K. , Misra, G. , & Pabshetwar, O. (2019). Is the Online Internet Streaming Going to Kill TV/Cable by 2025?. American Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, 7(4), 91-93.
Chicago Style
Agarwal, Arun, Kabita Agarwal, Gourav Misra, and Omkar Pabshetwar. "Is the Online Internet Streaming Going to Kill TV/Cable by 2025?." American Journal of Electrical and Electronic Engineering 7, no. 4 (2019): 91-93.
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[1]  https://www.praguepost.com/technology/how-modern-day-streaming-will-take-over-television
In article      
 
[2]  https://yourstory.com/2016/06/internet-media-india-report/
In article      
 
[3]  https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/business/india- business/number-indian-internet-users-will-reach-500-million-by- june-2018-iamai-says/articleshow/62998642.cms
In article      
 
[4]  https://www.recode.net/2018/6/8/17441288/internet-time-spent-tv-zenith-data-media
In article      
 
[5]  https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/281851
In article      
 
[6]  https://neweconomist.blogs.com/new_economist/2006/03/nothing_can_sto.html
In article      
 
[7]  https://www.brandwatch.com/blog/has-the-internet-taken-over-tv/
In article