Open Access Peer-reviewed

Influence of Crushed Coarse Aggregates on Properties of Concrete

I. B. Muhit1,, S. Haque1, Md. Rabiul Alam2

1Department of Civil Engineering, Chittagong University of Engineering & Technology, Chittagong-4349, Bangladesh

2Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Chittagong University of Engineering & Technology, Chittagong-4349, Bangladesh

American Journal of Civil Engineering and Architecture. 2013, 1(5), 103-106. DOI: 10.12691/ajcea-1-5-3
Published online: August 25, 2017

Abstract

Both coarse aggregates and fine aggregates are the main constituents of concrete because they not only give the body to the concrete, it also have a significant effect on the fresh concrete based on aggregate’s shape, size, texture, grading and crushing type. Moreover it is proved that aggregate’s types has the severe effect on physic-mechanical properties of concrete as aggregate covered almost 70 to 80 percent of the total volume of concrete. This paper investigates the effects on properties of concrete due to types of crushed aggregates alone. To observe the effects of crushed aggregates sharply, all other components like water cement ratio kept constant for each type and two types of crushed aggregates were used. ‘Impact Crushed’ and ‘Vertically Shafted’ aggregates type have been used to prepare five different groups of concrete blocks and these five groups have different water-cement (w/c) ratio. Source of these two aggregates, density and water absorption also kept constant to identify the effects on properties of concrete only for crushing type. Finally after 1 week and after 4 weeks slump values (consistency of the concrete) and compressive strength were measured without mixing any admixture or superplasticiser to the concrete. Compressive strength difference for all groups at 1 week and 4 weeks also analysed at the end of the study.

Keywords:

aggregates, properties of concrete, type of aggregates, water cement ratio, water absorption
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